Sociology - B.A.

College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Sociology
215 Merrill Hall
Kent Campus
330-672-2562
www.kent.edu/sociology


Description

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology provides broad training in the theories and methods that sociologists use to understand contemporary social issues and problems. Students are encouraged to think critically as they examine issues ranging from small group behavior to global social movements. The core curriculum  focuses on social inequalities, social psychology and health and illness. In addition, the program offers courses on a variety of topics, including urban living, deviant behavior, religion and family.

All students in the Sociology major select at least one concentration from the seven offered, in consultation with the undergraduate coordinator of sociology, department faculty or academic advisor.

The Sociology major comprises the following concentrations:

  • The Cultural Sociology concentration examines culture, which includes matters of social status and cultural distinctions; values, norms and beliefs; ethnicity and ethnic diversity; religion; language; art; popular culture, consumption/consumerism and style; and material culture (e.g., mass media, technology, architecture, food). This concentration addresses the role of culture in a diversity of social contexts, including urban life and organizations. It is relevant for students interested in careers in human or social services, nonprofit and community organizations, research and government agencies and human resources, as well as graduate study in the social sciences or humanities.
  • The Family and Life Course Sociology concentration introduces students to the cultural, political and historical realities and changes in families across the lifespan. Courses examine issues such as gender socialization, dating and romance, cohabitation, marriage, divorce, parenthood, domestic violence, death and dying, family diversity and family policy. This concentration is relevant to students interested in careers in health care promotion, public health, family counseling, long-term care institutions, program planning, community education and policy analysis, as well as graduate study in the social sciences.
  • The General concentration is for students who either choose not to pursue a specialization within the major or wish to pursue an individualized program of study (through sociology electives) that does not align with the substantive concentrations.
  • The Medical Sociology concentration introduces students to the relationship between society and health. In this concentration, students study the impact of social, cultural, political and economic factors on health (and vice-versa). Courses in this area examine issues such as health behavior, physical and mental illnesses, doctor-patient interaction, medicalization, health care reform, health care delivery and health policy. This concentration is relevant for students interested in careers in administrative and program planning related to medicine, mental health, social services, patient advocacy, mental health facilities and nursing homes, as well as graduate study in the social sciences.
  • The Social Inequalities concentration examines how social structural factors, such as age, gender, race, ethnicity, social class and sexuality relate to power, social status, wealth, income, health and morality. Courses in this area examine issues of poverty, race and ethnic inequality, sexism, age discrimination, neighborhood segregation, labor market processes and income disparity. This concentration is relevant for students interested in careers related to human or social services, nonprofit and community organizations, research and government agencies and human resources, as well as graduate study in the social sciences.
  • The Social Problems, Deviance and Crime concentration examines a variety of social problems with special emphasis on types of behavior that are inconsistent with social norms, challenge to social order and areillegal. This concentration also examines the role of morality, public opinion, politics, government, law, and institutions of social control in the definition of, as well as the response to, social problems, deviance and crime. While containing some overlap with other concentrations in the Criminology and Justice Studies major, the sociological perspective here suggests important commonalities across the studies of crime, deviance and social problems, as well as the relevance of broad sociological themes, including critical inquiry, empirical research and increased awareness of social context. This concentration provides relevant preparation for students interested in further study in the areas of public safety, social policy, social services and civil service and graduate studies in law or social science. It can also be a convenient and constructive resource enabling a double major between Sociology and Criminology and Justice Studies.
  • The Sociological Social Psychology concentration introduces students to the sociological approach to social psychology. Courses in this area examine theoretical perspectives that link structural factors such as gender, social class and race to individual factors and behaviors such as self-concept, identity, deviance and mental health. Courses typically include an overview of specific sociological topics such as socialization, emotions, social influence, group conflict and decision-making, prejudice and discrimination, status and power and interpersonal relationships. This concentration provides a foundation for students interested in careers or graduate work that focus on the many connections between individuals and the groups to which they belong.

FULLY OFFERED AT:

Cultural Sociology, Family and Life Course Sociology, Medical Sociology

  • Kent Campus

General Concentration, Social Inequalities, Social Problems, Deviance and Crime, Sociological Social Psychology

  • Kent Campus
  • Stark Campus

Admission Requirements

The university affirmatively strives to provide educational opportunities and access to students with varied backgrounds, those with special talents and adult students who graduated from high school three or more years ago.

Freshman Students on the Kent Campus: The freshman admission policy on the Kent Campus is selective. Admission decisions are based upon the following: cumulative grade point average, ACT and/or SAT scores, strength of high school college preparatory curriculum and grade trends. The Admissions Office at the Kent Campus may defer the admission of students who do not meet admissions criteria but who demonstrate areas of promise for successful college study. Deferred applicants may begin their college coursework at one of seven Regional Campuses of Kent State University. For more information on admissions, including additional requirements for some academic programs, visit the admissions website for new freshmen.

Freshman Students on the Regional Campuses:  Kent State campuses at Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas, as well as the Regional Academic Center in Twinsburg, have open enrollment admission for students who hold a high school diploma, GED or equivalent.

English Language Proficiency Requirements for International Students: All international students must provide proof of English language proficiency (unless they meet specific exceptions) by earning a minimum 525 TOEFL score (71 on the Internet-based version), minimum 75 MELAB score, minimum 6.0 IELTS score or minimum 48 PTE Academic score, or by completing the ELS level 112 Intensive Program. For more information on international admission, visit the Office of Global Education’s admission website.

Transfer, Transitioning and Former Students: For more information about admission criteria for transfer, transitioning and former students, please visit the admissions website.

Program Learning Outcomes

Graduates of this program will be able to:

  1. Describe how sociology is similar to and different from other social sciences.
  2. Show how one’s personal life is shaped by the time and place in which one lives.
  3. Demonstrate how institutions of family, education, religion, medicine and the economy are interrelated.
  4. Understand the interrelationships between social structures and individuals in society.
  5. Distinguish between individualistic, cultural and structural explanations of social events.
 
 

University Requirements 

All students in a bachelor's degree program at Kent State University must complete the following university requirements for graduation.

NOTE:  University requirements may be fulfilled in this program by specific course requirements. Please see Program Requirements for details.

Destination Kent State: First Year Experience 1
Course is not required for students with 25 transfer credits, excluding College Credit Plus, or age 21+ at time of admission.
Diversity Domestic/Global (DIVD/DIVG) 2 courses
Students must successfully complete one domestic and one global course, of which one must be from the Kent Core.
Experiental Learning Requirement (ELR) varies
Students must successfully complete one course or approved experience.
Kent Core (see table below) 36-37
Writing-Intensive Course (WIC) 1 course
Students must earn a minimum C grade in the course.
Upper-Division Requirement 39 (or 42)
Students must successfully complete 39 upper-division (numbered 30000 to 49999) credit hours to graduate. Students in a B.A. and/or B.S. degree in the College of Arts and Sciences must complete 42 upper-division credit hours.
Total Credit Hour Requirement 120
Some bachelor's degrees require students to complete more than 120 credit hours.

Kent Core Requirements

Kent Core Composition (KCMP) 6
Kent Core Mathematics and Critical Reasoning (KMCR) 3
Kent Core Humanities and Fine Arts (KHUM/KFA) (min one course each) 9
Kent Core Social Sciences (KSS) (must be from two disciplines) 6
Kent Core Basic Sciences (KBS/KLAB) (must include one laboratory) 6-7
Kent Core Additional (KADL) 6
Total Credit Hours: 36-37

Program Requirements

Major Requirements

Major Requirements (courses count in major GPA)
SOC 12050INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (DIVD) (KSS) 3
SOC 32210RESEARCHING SOCIETY (ELR) (WIC) 13
SOC 32220DATA ANALYSIS 23
SOC 32221DATA ANALYSIS LABORATORY 21
SOC 42126SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES 3
Sociology (SOC) Elective3
Sociology Upper-Division Electives (SOC 30000 or 40000 level)6
Additional Requirements (courses do not count in major GPA)
UC 10097DESTINATION KENT STATE: FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE 1
Foreign Language (see Foreign Language College Requirement below)14-16
Kent Core Composition6
Kent Core Mathematics and Critical Reasoning3
Kent Core Humanities and Fine Arts (minimum one course from each)9
Kent Core Social Sciences (must be from two disciplines)3
Kent Core Basic Sciences (must include one laboratory)6-7
Kent Core Additional6
College General Requirement (must be from Kent Core Basic Sciences) 33
College General Requirement (must be from Kent Core Social Sciences) 43
General Electives (total credit hours depends on earning 120 credit hours, including 42 upper-division credit hours)32
Concentrations
Choose from the following:12
Minimum Total Credit Hours:120
1

A minimum C grade must be earned to fulfill the writing-intensive requirement.

2

Students who have declared majors in both Sociology and Psychology may substitute PSYC 21621 for SOC 32220 and SOC 32221.

3

One additional course taken from the Kent Core Basic Science courses in the following Arts and Sciences disciplines: Anthropology (ANTH), Biological Sciences (BSCI), Chemistry (CHEM), Geography (GEOG), Geology (GEOL) or Physics (PHY). Students may take the courses listed in the "introductory" sequences with the restrictions noted above in the Kent Core Basic Science section. The course may not be from the student's major.

4

One additional course taken from the Kent Core Social Sciences courses in the following Arts and Sciences disciplines: Anthropology (ANTH), Applied Conflict Management (CACM), Geography (GEOG), Criminology and Justice Studies (CRIM), Political Science (POL), Psychology (PSYC) or Sociology (SOC). The course may not be from the student's major.

Graduation Requirements

Minimum Major GPA Minimum Overall GPA
2.000 2.000
 

Foreign Language College Requirement

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Arts and Sciences must complete 14-16 credit hours of foreign language.1

To complete the requirement, students have the equivalent of Elementary I and II in any language, plus one of the following options:

  1. Intermediate I and II of the same language 2
  2. Elementary I and II of a second language
  3. Any combination of two courses from the following list:
1

All students with prior foreign language experience should take the foreign language placement test to determine the appropriate level at which to start. Some students may begin beyond the Elementary I level and will complete the requirement with fewer credit hours and fewer courses.This may be accomplished by (1) passing a course beyond Elementary I through Intermediate II level; (2) receiving credit through Credit by Exam (CBE), Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB) or College Level Examination Program (CLEP); or (3) being designated a "native speaker" of a non-English language (consult with the College of Arts and Sciences Advising Office for additional information). When students complete the requirement with fewer than 14 credit hours and four courses, they will complete remaining credit hours with general electives.

2

Certain majors, concentrations and minors may require specific languages, limit the languages from which a student may choose or require coursework through Intermediate II. Students who plan to pursue graduate study may need particular language coursework.

  • To fulfill the diversity requirement, students must take one global diversity course that is not a sociology (SOC) course.

Cultural Sociology Concentration Requirements

[AS-BA-SOC-CUSO]

Concentration Requirements (courses count in major GPA)
SOC 32673URBAN SOCIOLOGY 3
SOC 42559CULTURE AND SOCIETY 3
Choose from the following:6
CRIME AND JUSTICE IN POPULAR CULTURE
INEQUALITY IN SOCIETIES (DIVD)
SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER (DIVD)
RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES (DIVD)
DEATH AND DYING
SOCIOLOGY OF FOOD
SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION
BUREAUCRATIC ORGANIZATIONS
Minimum Total Credit Hours:12

Family and Life Course Sociology Concentration Requirements

[AS-BA-SOC-FLCS]

Concentration Requirements (courses count in major GPA)
SOC 24011INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS AND FAMILIES 3
or SOC 32560 SOCIOLOGY OF FAMILIES (DIVD)
Choose from the following:9
SOCIOLOGY OF SEXUALITIES (DIVD)
DEATH AND DYING
SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER (DIVD)
CHILDHOOD IN SOCIETY
ADOLESCENCE IN SOCIETY
FAMILIES IN A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE (DIVG)
SOCIOLOGY OF FAMILY VIOLENCE
AGING IN SOCIETY (DIVD)
Minimum Total Credit Hours:12

General Concentration Requirements

[AS-BA-SOC-GENL]

Concentration Requirements (courses count in major GPA)
Sociology (SOC) Elective3
Sociology Upper-Division Electives (SOC 30000 or 40000 level)9
Minimum Total Credit Hours:12

Medical Sociology Concentration Requirements

[AS-BA-SOC-MESO]

Concentration Requirements (courses count in major GPA)
SOC 22570UNDERSTANDING DIFFERENCES AND INEQUALITY 3
or SOC 22778 SOCIAL PROBLEMS (DIVG) (KSS)
or SOC 32570 INEQUALITY IN SOCIETIES (DIVD)
SOC 42010DEATH AND DYING 3
or SOC 42879 AGING IN SOCIETY (DIVD)
SOC 42562SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL ILLNESS 3
SOC 42563SOCIOLOGY OF HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE 3
Minimum Total Credit Hours:12

Social Inequalities Concentration Requirements

[AS-BA-SOC-SOIN]

Concentration Requirements (courses count in major GPA)
SOC 22570UNDERSTANDING DIFFERENCES AND INEQUALITY 13
or SOC 22778 SOCIAL PROBLEMS (DIVG) (KSS)
or SOC 32570 INEQUALITY IN SOCIETIES (DIVD)
Choose from the following:9
SOCIOLOGY OF SEXUALITIES (DIVD)
MINORITIES IN THE UNITED STATES (DIVD)
URBAN SOCIOLOGY
SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER (DIVD)
WEALTH, POVERTY AND POWER
RACE AND ETHNIC STUDIES (DIVD)
AGING IN SOCIETY (DIVD)
Minimum Total Credit Hours:12
1

Students may take a second course from this area, substituting it for one of the concentration requirements listed below. 

Social Problems, Deviance and Crime Concentration Requirements

[AS-BA-SOC-SPDC]

Concentration Requirements (courses count in major GPA)
CRIM 36702CRIMINOLOGY 3
or SOC 32762 DEVIANT BEHAVIOR
SOC 22778SOCIAL PROBLEMS (DIVG) (KSS) 3
SOC 32570INEQUALITY IN SOCIETIES (DIVD) 3
or SOC 42558 WEALTH, POVERTY AND POWER
Choose from the following:3
ISSUES IN LAW AND SOCIETY (KSS)
CRIME AND JUSTICE IN POPULAR CULTURE
JUVENILE DELINQUENCY
MINORITIES IN CRIME AND JUSTICE (DIVD)
WOMEN IN CRIME AND JUSTICE (DIVD)
IMMIGRATION: LAW, CRIME AND JUSTICE (DIVD)
CRIME, JUSTICE AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE
SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL ILLNESS
Minimum Total Credit Hours:12

Sociological Social Psychology Concentration Requirements

[AS-BA-SOC-SSPS]

Concentration Requirements (courses count in major GPA)
SOC 32400INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY 3
Choose from the following:9
DEVIANT BEHAVIOR
SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER (DIVD)
SELF AND IDENTITY
SOCIOLOGY OF MENTAL ILLNESS
SOCIAL STRUCTURE AND INDIVIDUAL LIVES
Minimum Total Credit Hours:12
 

Roadmap

This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses designated as critical (!) must be completed in the semester listed to ensure a timely graduation.

Plan of Study Grid
Semester OneCredits
SOC 12050 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (DIVD) (KSS) 3
UC 10097 DESTINATION KENT STATE: FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE 1
Foreign Language 4
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
 Credit Hours14
Semester Two
Concentration Elective 3
Foreign Language 4
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
 Credit Hours16
Semester Three
Concentration Requirement 3
Foreign Language 3
College General Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
 Credit Hours15
Semester Four
Concentration Requirement 3
Foreign Language 3
College General Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
 Credit Hours15
Semester Five
!SOC 32210 RESEARCHING SOCIETY (ELR) (WIC) 3
Concentration Requirement 3
Sociology (SOC) Elective 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
General Elective 3
 Credit Hours15
Semester Six
!SOC 32220 DATA ANALYSIS 3
!SOC 32221 DATA ANALYSIS LABORATORY 1
Sociology Upper-Division Electives (SOC 30000 or 40000 level) 6
Kent Core Requirement 3
General Elective 3
 Credit Hours16
Semester Seven
!SOC 42126 SOCIOLOGICAL THEORIES 3
General Electives 12
 Credit Hours15
Semester Eight
General Electives 14
 Credit Hours14
 Minimum Total Credit Hours:120