College of Podiatric Medicine

College of Podiatric Medicine
6000 Rockside Woods Blvd.
Independence
216-231-3300 or 800-238-7903
podiatry@kent.edu
www.kent.edu/cpm


Description

The mission of the College of Podiatric Medicine is to educate students to be highly competent doctors of podiatric medicine who will excel in residency training.

Formerly the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, Kent State's College of Podiatric Medicine is one of nine accredited podiatry colleges in the United States and is a four-year, graduate level medical college, granting the Doctor of Podiatric Medicine degree. Founded in 1916 as the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, the college has graduated more than 6,000 podiatrists who have made outstanding contributions to the field and study of podiatric medicine. The college has regional and national affiliations with more than 50 world-wide hospitals and more than 300 private practitioners nationwide that provide externship training to podiatry students. Currently, the college maintains an average four year school enrollment of 425 students and typically graduates 85-100 podiatrists a year.

The College of Podiatric Medicine is accredited by the Council on Podiatric Medical Education. Accreditation.

Departments and Schools

Graduate Programs

Policies


Academic and Summary Dismissals

The following are policies regarding academic and summary dismissals from the College of Podiatric Medicine:

  1. Any student with one failure (course or rotation) during the academic year will be placed on academic probation. 
  2. Any student with two or more failures (any combination of courses or rotations) in one academic year will be academically dismissed from the College of Podiatric Medicine, with the right to appeal – provided that the student has not been previously dismissed (academic or otherwise) from the College of Podiatric Medicine. Students with a previous academic dismissal on their record will be academically dismissed without the right to appeal. Failures are cumulative across an academic year. 
  3. A student who fails a course or clinical rotation (including a remedial course or rotation) during a semester in which he or she is on academic probation will be academically dismissed with the right to appeal – provided that the student has not previously been academically dismissed from the College of Podiatric Medicine. Students with a previous academic dismissal on their record will be academically dismissed without the right to appeal. 
  4. At the conclusion of the spring semester of the 2nd year, students with cumulative grade point averages below 2.400 will be academically dismissed with the right to appeal – provided that the student has not previously been dismissed (academic or otherwise) from the College of Podiatric Medicine. Students with a previous dismissal on their record will be academically dismissed without the right to appeal. 
  5. In addition to academic dismissal without the right to appeal, any student who has been academically dismissed two times from the college is ineligible for readmission consideration at any time.

Student Appeals

Students are informed of their academic status by mail and e-mail from the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics. Students who have not previously been academically dismissed from the College of Podiatric Medicine shall have the right to appeal academic dismissal by requesting, in writing, a hearing before the Academic Appeals Committee. A form requesting an appearance before this committee may be obtained from the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics, and must be filed with this office on or before the date specified on the academic status letter. Students shall present information verbally and/or in writing to the committee, but must be present for the hearing. The decision of the committee is final.

The outcome of the hearing before the committee shall not be to overturn a dismissal, but rather to grant or deny the student readmission to the program. Students with failures on their transcripts who are offered the opportunity for readmission are placed on academic probation upon return to the program and remain on probation until all repeated courses are successfully completed. For students readmitted to the program with failures on their transcript, failure in any course or rotation while on academic probation will result in summary dismissal without the right to appeal.

A student who is readmitted after being dismissed for having a cumulative grade point average below 2.400 following the conclusion of the 2nd year spring semester will be required to participate in mandatory academic counseling during the entirety of his or her 3rd year. Please see the Remediation and Mandatory Academic Counseling policy in the College of Podiatric Medicine policies section of the catalog for additional information. 

Students who are not offered readmission to the program at the time of appeal are eligible to reapply to the college one year after the date of dismissal by contacting the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics.  

When one of the following specific actions is taken concerning students enrolled at College of Podiatric Medicine, a notation will be made on their transcript: "academic probation" or "academic dismissal".

Please refer to the Clerkship and Senior Medicine Rotations and Clinical Rotations policies for specifics on clinical requirements. Please refer to the Readmission, Student Conduct and Academic Appeals Committee policies for additional information. All policies are located in the College Policies section of the College of Podiatric Medicine page in the University Catalog.

Academic Appeals Committee

The Academic Appeals Committee serves numerous functions. One of its primary roles is to allow the student due process in the event of their academic dismissal. The committee listens to the student’s appeal and ultimately renders a decision concerning the student’s ability to successfully master the curriculum. The committee will also be convened at any time to consider other matters, including but not limited to, readmission to the program for students who had previously withdrawn, or to review additional supporting documentation submitted by previously dismissed students (academic or otherwise) requesting readmission to the program. In all matters, the  committee reviews the student’s appeal and ultimately renders a decision concerning the student’s ability to successfully master the curriculum.

Students previously dismissed for reasons other than academics who are applying for readmission will have their request considered by the dean. The decision of the dean approving or denying readmission for these students is final. 

Membership of the Academic Appeals Committee is as follows:

Voting members

  • Four faculty members
  • Senior associate dean of academic affairs (or designee)

Non-voting members

  • Director of academic services and enrollment analytics (or designee)
  • Director of educational resources (or designee)

Hearing Procedure

  • Request
    • A request for hearing shall be made by the student in writing to the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics and shall include a statement of facts summarizing the basis for the appearance. Such requests must be submitted by the deadline specified by the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics. 
  • Preparation for Hearing
    • A written notice of the date, time and place of the hearing shall be given to the committee members and the student requesting the hearing.
    • At the scheduled meeting, all committee members shall be given a copy of any written statements prepared by the student and access to the student’s academic file. 
  • Hearing
    • The student must be present at the requested hearing and may make an oral and/or written presentation to the committee.
    • Attorney or legal counsel for any parties involved may be present in the room during a hearing, but may not participate directly in the hearing. The legal counsel may only advise his/her client. The Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics must be notified at the time of the request for an appeal if the student intends on having legal counsel present at the hearing. 
    • Letters in support of the student must be submitted in advance of the hearing. 
    • The student (and legal counsel) is excused from the room prior to deliberation. 
    • The committee shall deliberate and formulate a decision in the absence of the involved parties. Votes shall be by ballot. There are two decision options:
      • Offer the student readmission to the program or
      • deny the student readmission to the program. 
    • The meeting is then adjourned. 
    • The committee’s decision is final. It is transmitted, in writing, by the director of the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics to all involved parties. 

Privacy of Records and Hearing

  • The committee will act in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) regarding the information of a student’s record. 
  • All proceedings of a hearing are confidential. No member of the committee shall disclose and of the subject matter or discuss these matters with anyone except members of the committee.

Academic Performance and Student Organizations

The College of Podiatric Medicine offers a number of student organizations, fraternities and sports clubs to serve the student population. Student organizations, fraternities and clubs are subject to college policies. The Office of Student Affairs has the right to review and revoke the privilege to continue as a recognized chapter of any organization or fraternity. A full listing of organizations is available on the College of Podiatric Medicine website. 

Each organization, fraternity or club has elected positions in which members of the College of Podiatric Medicine student body may hold office. In order to participate and hold office in any position, including, but not limited to, President; Vice President; Secretary; Treasurer; Director of Clinical Affairs; Race Coordinator; Delegate, etc., the student must be in good academic standing. Specifically, students must have a 2.500 cumulative GPA with no academic failures to run and/or hold an elected position within any organization, fraternity, or club. In addition, students must pass boards on their first attempt. 

Academic records will be checked fall and spring semesters and after boards results are posted. Students who fall below the academic minimums or fail to pass boards on their first attempt will be removed from his or her position within a particular club, organization or fraternity so that the student may focus on academic and/or boards performance. 

In addition, a student who receives two or more professionalism deficiencies will be removed from any position within a particular club, organization or fraternity. 

A formal notification will be sent from the Office of Student Affairs to those students who fail to meet the minimum requirements to hold office. 

American Podiatric Medical Licensing Examination (APMLE)

The College of Podiatric Medicine emphasizes the importance of fully preparing for and passing the National Board of Podiatric Medical Examiners’ American Podiatric Medical Licensing Examination (APMLE), Part I and II. These exams are recognized as part of the licensing process by a member of state, federal and Canadian provincial legal agencies governing the practice of podiatric medicine. All podiatric residency programs require passage of APMLE Part I and Part II (written examination and the Clinical Skills Patient Encounter (CSPE) examination) prior to the beginning of the residency.
Eligible students are required to take the APMLE Part I and both portions of Part II (written examination and the Clinical Skills Patient Encounter - CSPE examination) the first time the examinations are offered, and every subsequent time if necessary.
Students who have not passed APMLE Part I will not be eligible to take Part II. Those students will be under the college’s Board Part I Failure Policy (see below). Subsequent failures of Part I may delay graduation and/or result in summary dismissal without the right of appeal.

APMLE Part I the First Time Offered

Eligible students are required to first sit for the American Podiatric Medical Licensing Examination Part I (APMLE-1) in July.
For those students who pass APMLE-1, their pathway to graduation is unchanged, taking third-year courses and rotations through February of the following year. In March, students start CLI 804xx clinical rotations. For the summer semester of the following year, students return to campus for their senior experience and senior exams. Upon successful completion of all requirements, students graduate on time in May.

College of Podiatric Medicine Board Part 1 Failure Policy

Students will find out if they passed APMLE-1 in late July or early August, when National Board of Podiatric Medical Examiners distributes the exam scores. Students who fail the July exam will continue with third-year classes and August clinical rotations. Beginning in September, students will be removed from clinic and enrolled in a structured remediation process to prepare for the required retake in October. Starting with the beginning of the October clinical rotation, students will resume clinic rotations and continue with their second-semester classes.*
(*APMLE Pathway I students will only be excused from clinic the day of the October APMLE Part I reexamination. Students will be required to attend all other days for the October rotation, including the first day of the rotation.)
In late October or early November, when the National Board of Podiatric Medical Examiners distributes the October retake exam scores, students will continue on one of the two following pathways.

  1. Pathway I – Passage: Students who pass the October APMLE-1 retake exam will continue in class and clinic through February. In March these students will make up the clinical rotation that was missed in September. Beginning with the April rotation, these students will attend CLI 804xx clinical rotations. These students will lose one month of an optional external clerkship elective. For the summer semester of the following year, students will return to the College of Podiatric Medicine to begin their senior experience and senior exams, and, upon successful completion of all requirements, will graduate with their original class.
  2. Pathway II – Failure: Students who fail the October APMLE-1 retake exam will continue in class and clinic through November. They will not attend clinic beginning in December, but will continue in class through February. Beginning with the summer semester in March, students will be enrolled in PMD 80396 Independent Study for the required APMLE-1 July retake exam. They will have no other academic or clinical responsibilities, unless required to complete a remedial course or rotation. In July, they will sit for the APMLE-1 retake exam. Students will find out if they passed APMLE-1 in late July or early August when the National Board of Podiatric Medical Examiners distributes the exam scores. Students who fail the July retake exam will be summarily dismissed with no right of appeal.

Students who pass will continue along this pathway, as follows:

Between September and the end of February, students will make up four third-year clinic rotations. In March, they begin CLI 804xx clinical rotations. For the summer semester of the following year, students will return to campus for their senior experience and senior exams. Upon successful completion of all requirements, they will graduate in May, one year following their original graduation date.

Attendance

Classroom and Laboratory Attendance

Attendance is expected of all students, and an instructor may require, at his/her discretion, compulsory attendance in a course, including any or all laboratory sessions, lectures or demonstrations. When the instructor does not state attendance as a compulsory requirement, students remain responsible for all material covered in that course, including all examinations, quizzes, and projects. A student's eligibility to complete make-up work is at the discretion of the course instructor. 

Attendance at scheduled examinations is mandatory. Please see the Examination Policy for full details.

Clinic Attendance

Attendance is mandatory at assigned clinical rotations, at the outpatient treatment center, at the community medicine clinics and at all the college-approved external clinical rotations and clerkship programs. Anyone making up clinic days for any reason cannot make up missed days during regularly scheduled course lectures or labs. Absence due to religious observances must be cleared, in advance, with the senior associate dean.

Students who are sick must call the Office of Academic Support at 216-916-7484 before 9 a.m. on the day of absence. If there is no answer, students should leave a voice message or e-mail cpmacademicsupport@kent.edu. If students do not call or e-mail before 9 a.m., they must complete a three-day make-up for the one day missed. If students notify the Office of Student Academic Support in advance, they must complete a one-day make-up for the one day missed, provided that the reason for the absence is approved. 

If students are absent due to illness, they must submit a doctor’s excuse to make up only the one day of absence. However, if students do not bring in a doctor’s excuse for the absence, a three-day automatic make-up will be implemented for the absence, and students may be subject to failure of the rotation.

All excused absences require a “Request for Student Absence from Clinic Rotation” form. At the students’ earliest convenience, they should stop by the college’s Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics on the second floor to pick up the form. Students must have this form approved and signed by the rotation coordinator two weeks before the clinic absence. When making up the absence, this form must be completed and signed by the doctor working at clinic.

Make-up days will be assigned to students with the following deadlines in mind:
Please note, the time deadline for make-up days for a VA rotation are the same as the other core rotations, but the process and method are at the discretion of the VA.

  • Make-up days for CLI 803xx-level rotations must be completed no later than the end of February of the third-year spring semester. The date and time of the make-up days will be assigned to the student. 
  • Make-up days for CLI 804xx-level rotations must be completed within 30 days from the beginning of the student's next rotation back in town. The date and time of the make-up days will be assigned to the student. 

Clinical Attendance for Rotations at External Facilities

External rotations follow the schedule of the facility, not the college. This includes closures due for any reason – including closures for inclement weather. External rotations are facilities in which students rotate for a variety of 3rd and 4th Year clinical rotations. These rotations include, but are not limited to, 3rd and 4th Year DVA, clerkships, senior medicine, simulated patients (both I and II), podiatric surgery, and community medicine. You may also be scheduled at external sites during any other CFAC rotation.
When completing a rotation, or a portion of a rotation, at an external facility, you are required to follow that facility’s schedule. This may include evenings, weekends, and holidays. If KSU or KSUCPM is closed during a regular holiday period you must report to the external experience as their schedule dictates.
In addition, in the event you are scheduled for a rotation at an external facility and KSU or KSUCPM closes due to inclement weather or other circumstances, you are required to report to your rotation on that day if the external facility is open.   

Clinical Attendance for Pathway I Students:

APMLE – Pathway I students will only be excused from clinic the day of the October APMLE Part I reexamination. Students will be required to attend all other days for the October rotation, including the first day of the rotation.

Senior Experience Attendance

Senior Experience takes place during the fourth-year summer semester and includes CMD 80424: Business Administration, CLI 80585: Senior Competency, and the possibility of additional lectures and workshops. Students will be sent a schedule prior to the start of the Senior Experience. Attendance at all Senior Experience activities and events is mandatory.

Academic Presence Verification

In compliance with federal regulations, all course and rotation coordinators are required to verify student academic presence for every student. The method of how academic presence is verified is at the sole discretion of each coordinator and may differ from course to course or rotation to rotation. The meeting of academic presence requirements as determined by the coordinator is mandatory for all students.
 Students who do not meet academic presence verification requirements will receive a professionalism deficiency, will receive an NF (Never Attended – Fail) grade for each course in which the requirement was not met, and may lose their federal financial aid for that particular semester.

Background Checks and Drug Testing

Background Checks

Background check reports will be make available electronically to the College of Podiatric Medicine. 

Discrepancies in background check reports are subject to review by the Dean and could result in a student's dismissal or rescission of admission offer from the College of Podiatric Medicine. Students who refuse to submit to a background check or do not pass the background check review are subject to dismissal or rescission of admission offer from the College of Podiatric Medicine. 

Students and applicants have the right to review the information reported by the designated company for accuracy and completeness, and to request that the designated company verify that the background information provided is correct. Prior to making a final determination that will adversely affect the applicant or student, the college will provide applicants and students the opportunity to address any issues or discrepancies found in the report. 

Students who have been accepted into the program but who have yet to begin are required to complete a background check prior to matriculation (dates and deadline to be determined by the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics). 

For current students, FBI & BCI background checks are required at the following schedule:

  • February of the 2nd Year spring semester (date to be determined by the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics).
  • February of the 3rd Year spring semester (date to be determined by the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics). 

If an FBI or BCI background check comes back with a discrepancy or the statement, "May not meet employment conditions," the student is required to provide the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics with a rapsheet form. Instructions for requesting the rapsheet form will be provided to the student. 

Please note, some clinical programs may require specific background checks and/or additional documentation. 

Drug Testing

Students who have been accepted into the program but who have yet to begin are required to complete a drug test prior to matriculation (dates and deadline to be determined by the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics). 

Current students are required to complete a drug test prior to the beginning of the 3rd Year fall semester (dates and deadline to be determined by the Offfice of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics). 

Drug test result reports will be made available electronically to the College of Podiatric Medicine. 

Drug test results are subject to review by the Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine. Positive drug screens will be cause for review by the Dean on a case by case basis and could result in a student's dismissal or rescission of admission offer from the College of Podiatric Medicine. 

Please note, additional drug tests may be required in the event of a positive result, or if required by a program for the completion of a clinical rotation.

Board Prep Exam

The Board Prep Exam is mandatory. Failure to take the exam will result in a professionalism deficiency evaluation.

BoxCast

It is a violation of copyright law to copy, download or print any portion of the BoxCast lectures.

Clerkship and Senior Medicine Rotations

Information on clerkship and senior medicine rotations, including the selection process, may be obtained by contacting the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics.

Senior Medicine

The date of the selection of senior medicine rotations will be determined by the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics. If an agreement on senior medicine selections within a student group cannot be reached by the group members, final determination will be made by random selection by a representative of the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics.

Senior Medicine rotations may include out-of-state locations and facilities not within the immediate area of the college. The Office of Academic Services & Enrollment Analytics and the KSUCPM Administration will determine which locations will be considered mandatory, meaning that all spots available at those locations will be required to be filled by students in each group.

Please note, the number of spots for each Senior Medicine rotation is limited within each group. The number of available spots at each location is determined by numerous factors, including facility preference and availability and the number of students in that particular group.

Completion of Clerkship and Senior Medicine Rotations

Once a student selects a clerkship or a senior medicine rotation, the student is required to attend that specific rotation for the month chosen. Schedule changes, including dropping rotations or switching months, are not permitted. Students who do not attend a scheduled rotation will fail the rotation and be required to make up the rotation beginning May of the student's 4th year (location and specifics of make-up rotations will be assigned to the student by the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics). Students will also receive a professionalism deficiency evaluation and be placed on academic probation. In rare cases, schedule changes may be permitted provided that the student can demonstrate extreme circumstances that will prevent the completion of a particular rotation.

Students who wish to be considered for this type of schedule change must submit the request in writing along with supporting documentation to the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics. Once the request is reviewed, the student will be sent notification of the decision either approving or denying the requested schedule change. If the request is denied, the student will be required to attend the rotation as scheduled.

Feedback and Surveys

At the conclusion of each clerkship and senior medicine rotation, students will receive a link via e-mail to a rotation feedback survey.  The completion of the rotation feedback survey for each rotation by the deadline given is mandatory. Students who miss the deadline will be subject to a professionalism deficiency evaluation as well as possibly additional disciplinary actions (please see the Professionalism Deficiency Evaluation policy for further information).

Patient Logs

Students are required to submit in Typhon a patient log for every patient encounter experienced (observed, assisted, or performed) for every clinical rotation (external and core rotations). Patient logs for each rotation must be completed and entered into Typhon by 8:00 a.m. on the Monday following the conclusion of the rotation. Failure to meet this deadline will result in a professionalism deficiency and possibly failure on the rotation.
For further information on what types of encounters are required to be logged during a particular clinical rotation, please see the coordinator for that specific rotation.

See Clerkship Handbook for this and all other policies regarding clerkship rotations.

Clinical Affiliation Agreements

For external clinical rotations completed during the 3rd and 4th YR, the college has executed affiliation agreements with facilities in which students rotate. Students are subject to the requirements listed in these agreements for any approved rotation. Student visitations are observation only and not for college credit, and therefore not considered approved rotations.

A list of all facilities with which the college has a current affiliation agreement is available by contacting the Office of Academic Services & Enrollment Analytics. Affiliation agreement status is subject to change at any time.

Students may review, in person only, the affiliation agreement for any facility in which he or she will be completing an external clinical rotation. To do so, please contact the Academic Services & Enrollment Analytics.

Clinical Rotations

The outpatient treatment center and its allied extension clinics exist not only for the purpose of educating podiatric medical students, but also to serve the community at large. The delivery of podiatric health care to the public, as well as the delivery of podiatric education to third- and fourth-year students, is under the direction of the dean of the college. During each of the clinical rotations, students are exposed to a variety of clinical materials and also have an opportunity to serve the public through participation in ultra-marathon and marathon treatment stations, foot screenings and other community activities.

The policy and procedures governing the operation of the Cleveland Foot and Ankle Clinic are in place to assure quality care and education. Conformance to these policies and procedures by students is necessary to assure that educational outcomes are met and quality patient care delivered. Examples include, but are not limited to medical records, attendance, minor surgery, etc.

For third-year rotations other than Podiatric Surgery and Primary Care/VA, students who are unable to successfully complete a rotation exam will be given the opportunity to sit for one re-exam. Students who are not successful at passing this re-exam will fail the rotation and must repeat (remediate) the entire rotation before they proceed to the fourth year. For all clinical rotations and courses, students must refer to the course or rotation syllabus for specific requirements and details.

Attendance at External Clinical Rotations

Clinic policy – external rotations follow the schedule of the facility, not the college. This includes closures due to any reason – including closures for inclement weather. External rotations are facilities in which students rotate for a variety of 3rd and 4th Year clinical rotations. These rotations include, but are not limited to, 3rd and 4th Year DVA, clerkships, senior medicine, simulated patients (both I and II), podiatric surgery, and community medicine. You may also be scheduled at external sites during any other CFAC rotation.

When completing a rotation, or a portion of a rotation, at an external facility, you are required to follow that facility’s schedule. This may include evenings, weekends, and holidays. If KSU or KSUCPM is closed during a regular holiday period you must report to the external experience as their schedule dictates.In addition, in the event you are scheduled for a rotation at an external facility and KSU or KSUCPM closes due to inclement weather or other circumstances, you are required to report to your rotation on that day if the external facility is open.   

No student may proceed to any fourth-year rotation without having first satisfactorily completed all prior courses and clinical rotations. A student may not continue onto 4xxxx-level courses or rotations with a failure or grade or incomplete in any third-year course or clinical rotation. All 4xx-level clinical rotations follow the national calendar.

Clinical Remediation and Make-up Months

All 4th Year remedial rotations will take place starting in May in the 4th Year summer semester without exception. The dates of the rotation will be based on the national clerkship calendar. The location of the remedial rotation will be assigned to the student by the Office of Academic Services & Enrollment Analytics.
Make-up rotations for reasons other than academic failure (such as Leave of Absence) will be assigned by the Office of Academic Services & Enrollment Analytics and will take place over one full month (based on the AACPM national clerkship calendar) during the 4th Year summer semester. This includes location of the make-up month and dates of the rotation.

Clinic Rotation Groups and Schedule

Students will be randomly assigned into groups twice – once for 3rd Year clinical rotations and once for 4th Year clinical rotations – by the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics. Switching of groups and / or rotation months is not permitted.

Patient Logs

Students are required to submit in Typhon a patient log for every patient encounter experienced (observed, assisted, or performed) for every clinical rotation (external and core rotations). Patient logs for each rotation must be completed and entered into Typhon by 8:00 a.m. on the Monday following the conclusion of the rotation. Failure to meet this deadline will result in a professionalism deficiency and possibly failure on the rotation.
For further information on what types of encounters are required to be logged during a particular clinical rotation, please see the coordinator for that specific rotation.
Please see the Academic and Summary Dismissals policy for further information on rotation failures.

HIPAA Training

All students are required to complete HIPAA training. The method of delivery for the training as well as the dates and deadlines for completing training will be assigned by the Office of Enrollment Management and the Office of Academic Services & Enrollment Analytics.
Failure to complete HIPAA training by the assigned deadline will result in a professionalism deficiency evaluation and a delay in the student’s entry into clinical rotations.

For full policies and requirements as they relate to clinic, please see the Clinic Orientation Handbook.

Course Exemptions

Students who apply for exemption from a course because they have completed a course of similar nature must file a request with the college’s senior associate dean, the appropriate division head, and the director of enrollment management. Requests for a course exemption are handled on a case-by-case basis, and the decision on the part of the individuals listed in the preceding sentence is final. If the exemption request is approved, the student must also successfully complete a qualifying challenge exam with a minimum score of 80% or meet other criteria acceptable to the course instructor. No exemptions can be granted unless prior course work has received a “B” grade or better. Student requests for course exemptions will only be considered prior to matriculation.

Eligibility for Doctor of Podiatric Medicine Degree

All candidates for the degree Doctor of Podiatric Medicine must have:

  1. Maintained satisfactory academic performance with no grade below a C or S (satisfactory);
  2. Demonstrated clinical competence through completion of the performance objectives;
  3. Been verified as being in good disciplinary standing;
  4. Satisfactorily completed all academic requirements, including clinical rotations and externship/clerkship program requirements;
  5. Fulfilled all responsibilities and financial obligations to the college and to the university;
  6. Demonstrated moral and mental competency to practice podiatric medicine;
  7. Been recommended by the faculty for graduation;
  8. Taken and passed the American Podiatric Medical Licensing Examination (APMLE), Part I, taken both sections of Part II (written examination and the Clinical Skills Encounter – CSPE examination) and released the score reports to the college; and
  9. Passed senior competency examination.

To be eligible for graduation in May, candidates must have met all of the above requirements before June 30 immediately following the May graduation. Attendance at the graduation ceremony is required.

All students must successfully complete the graduation requirements within six years of their initial matriculation. Exceptions for students with extenuating circumstances must have the approval of the CPME. 

There is no contract stated or implied, between the college and the students that a degree will be conferred at any stated time, or at all.

Essential Requirements for Student Education

Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine is committed to the admission and advancement of all qualified students. College policy prohibits discrimination against anyone solely based on race, sexual orientation, gender, Veteran status, color, national origin, religion, age, handicap or disability. 

The faculty and administration have adopted the following technical standards and essential requirements that must be met by all students for progression and graduation. These technical standards expected of students seeking the degree of Doctor of Podiatric Medicine reflect the college's highest commitment to the safety of its students and patients, and recognize the essential functions of the profession of podiatric medicine. 

The following standards and requirements describe the academic abilities and non-academic qualifications that are essential to the program of instruction, are directly related to the licensing requirements, and are directly related to those physical abilities, mental abilities, skills, attitudes and behaviors that students must demonstrate or perform at each stage of their education to ultimately ensure patient safety. 

Technical Standards and Essential Requirements for Student Education at Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine

Visual Observation and Integration
Candidates and students must be able to observe demonstrations, video materials, slides through a microscope and computer screens. They must acquire information from written documents, radiographs, photographs, charts and diagrams. They must be able to observe a patient accurately close at hand and at a distance to assess asymmetry, range of motion and tissue/texture changes.

Communication
Candidates and students must be able to communicate effectively in oral and written formats, and in settings where time span is limited. This includes communication in classroom, clinical and laboratory settings. Candidates must be able to accurately elicit information in a timely and efficient manner. Candidates must be able to describe a patient's condition to the patient and to others in the diagnosis and treatment process.

Other Sensory Capacities
Students must independently be able to take an oral history, do stethoscopy and communicate while wearing a surgical mask. Students must also have sufficient somatosensory capacity to palpate pulses, use a tuning fork and assess skin temperature. 

Motor Functions
Candidates and students must have sufficient motor function to undertake classes, laboratories and demonstrations, to provide general patient care as well as emergency treatment to patients. This includes cadaver dissection, microscopy, aseptic technique and safe handling of microbiological specimens. Also included is the motor capacity for chart and prescription writing, palpation, percussion, auscultation and other diagnostic maneuvers. All of these tasks must be done in a timely and efficient manner within prescribed time limitations relative to the context of a practicing physician. Examples of common daily treatments include, but are not limited to, palliative care of foot and ankle problems, injections, orthotic impressions, taking and processing of pedal radiographs, and performance of soft tissue and osseous tissue surgical procedures. Examples of emergency treatments include CPR, administration of intravenous medications, the opening of obstructed airways, and hemostasis techniques.

Intellectual, Conceptual, Quantitative and Integrative Abilities
Candidates must have sufficient cognitive abilities and effective learning techniques to assimilate the detailed and complex information presented in the medical student curriculum. Candidates must engage in critical thinking and problem solving. They must be able to learn through a variety of modalities including, but not limited to, classroom and lab instruction and exams; small group, team and collaborative activities; individual study; preparation and presentation of reports and use of computer technology. Candidates must be able to consistently, quickly and accurately measure, calculate, interpret, reason, memorize, analyze, synthesize and transmit information across modalities. Candidates must be able to demonstrate these skills and procedures under pressure and in a timely fashion across a range of conditions and time frames. They must be able to recognize and draw conclusions about three-dimensional spatial relationships and logical sequential relationships among events. These skills and abilities are fully defined by the faculty and explained in course syllabi. 

Behavioral and Social Attributes
Candidates must demonstrate the maturity and emotional stability required for full use of their intellectual abilities. They must accept responsibility for learning, exercising good judgement and promptly completing all responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients. They must understand the legal and ethical aspects of the practice of medicine and function within both the law and ethical standards of the medical profession. Candidates must be able to work effectively, respectfully and professionally as part of the healthcare team and to interact with patients, their families and health care personnel in a courteous, professional and respectful manner. They must be able to tolerate physically taxing workloads and long work hours, to function effectively under stress and to display flexibility and adaptability to changing environments. 

Candidates must be able to work effectively, respectfully and professionally with faculty, staff and student colleagues. They must be capable of regular, reliable and punctual attendance at classes and in regard to their clinical responsibilities. Candidates must be able to contribute to collaborative, constructive learning environments; accept constructive feedback from others; and take personal responsibility for making appropriate positive changes. 

Involvement in Invasive and Exposure-prone Procedures
Candidates and students must be qualified to be personally and actively involved in invasive and exposure-prone procedures without being a danger to patients, other health care professionals or fellow students, faculty and staff. They must demonstrate adherence to the universal precautions as defined by the Center for Disease Control. As part of the technical standards and essential requirements to matriculate at the college, the following statement shall apply: If the student is HIV seropositive, the student may be restricted by the State Medical Board of Ohio from performing procedures required for graduation. If the student is HBV and/or HCV positive and does not demonstrate noninfectivity, the student may be restricted by the State Medical Board of Ohio from performing procedures required for graduation. Any questions regarding these requirements should be directed to the senior associate dean.

Examination Policy

The Examination Policies apply to all scheduled examinations, including exams specially scheduled to accommodate students with approved modifications in their exam schedule.

  1. The examinations for all courses are scheduled for the entire year and are listed in the Academic Calendar.
  2. Exams will be held in the classrooms unless otherwise indicated. No books, papers, notes, calculators, cell phones, watches, tablets and similar electronic devices, pens, pencils, markers, food, drink, backpacks or any other personal items are permitted in the room during an exam. Outerwear such as gloves, coats, hats, hoodies and handbags cannot be brought to the exam seat. Students should place their belongings in a locker prior to the exam. Restroom visits, taking medication and other personal needs must be taken care of prior to the students taking their assigned seat.
  3. The use of cell phones or any other forms of electronic communication during examinations is strictly forbidden. No electronic communication devices are permitted in the exam room. Students engaging in unauthorized electronic communication are subject to disciplinary action.
  4. Wearing colored glasses and/or hats, which interfere with the proctors’ full view of students’ eyes, are not permitted in the exam room.
  5. All students must have their exam downloaded prior to entering the classroom.
  6. Students are expected to be waiting outside the classroom 10 minutes before the start of the exam to ensure proper connection to Exam Soft. Students may enter the examination room only when permitted by the proctors. Students cannot start the exam until instructed to do so.
  7. Students will not be permitted to leave the exam room less than 30 minutes following the start of the exam.
  8. The official exam clock is clock on the Symposium. When the exam time expires, the exam administrator announces that the exam the computer has ended and instructs all students to close their exams and upload them to Exam Soft. No student, whether late arriving or not, will be given extra time to complete their exam. Once students begin an exam, no excuse will be accepted for failure to complete it.
  9. Students arriving 30 minutes or more after the scheduled start of an exam will automatically receive a zero points for the exam, unless they can demonstrate that they have a valid reason and have received an excused absence.
  10. Recurrent tardiness will not be tolerated. Two tardy incidents will result in a professionalism deficiency evaluation. Additional tardy incidents may result in disciplinary action. Tardiness is defined as arriving 30 minutes or more after the scheduled start of the exam.
  11. When finished with the exam, students will upload their exam, show the green screen to exam support staff or faculty as they exit the exam room, and will move quickly away from the exam room. All students must exit the exam room via a single classroom door. 
  12. Because of special circumstances in administering laboratory practical examinations, students should not arrive late. A student late for a laboratory exam may be permitted to enter the exam at the discretion of the faculty member (or designee). Students arriving late will not be given extra time to view questions that they missed because they arrived late.
  13. Only the course coordinator can grant an excused absence for an exam (didactic, lab, clinical). The following are examples of valid reasons for missing an exam: illness requiring objective evidence from a valid health care provider, hospitalization, death in the immediate family, incarceration or other compelling circumstance that may occur during a scheduled exam period or on an exam date. Students must provide written documentation. The following examples are not valid reasons for missing an exam: sleeping late, loitering nearby, lack of awareness of the exam time, forgetting the exam time, efforts to continue studying, traffic excuses and pre-arranged personal travel.
  14. Students who miss an exam receive zero points for that exam. If students have a valid reason for missing the exam, they are responsible for contacting the course coordinator within 24 hours of the administration of the exam. If a student has a valid reason, an excused absence is granted only by the course coordinator. The course coordinator’s decision is final with no right of appeal. The course coordinator notifies the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics that the students were granted an excused absence, and the zero points are removed from their record.
  15. If an excused absence is granted, the students and course coordinator arrange for a make-up exam. Failure of a student to secure an excused absence will result in zero points for that exam. Failure of the student to take the make-up examination at the agreed-upon date and time will result in zero points for that exam. See below for make-up examinations.
  16. Absences, due to religious observance, from required activities, such as scheduled exams and quizzes, lab practical and clinical rotations, must be cleared in advance by bringing legitimate documentation to the course coordinator prior to the beginning of the semester.
  17. Absences, due to seminar attendance, are only permitted for students who actively participate in the research project being presented at the seminar. Absences from required activities such as scheduled exams and quizzes, lab practical and clinical rotations, must be cleared in advance with the course coordinator. Students are responsible for all missed material and assignments. Examinations will be made up according to the Makeup Examination policy. Seminar attendance is a privilege, not a right. The faculty advisor will have final ruling regarding seminar attendance.
  18. Students are responsible for checking the accuracy of all posted scores, (didactic exams, quizzes, lab practical, etc.), course or rotation grades or other forms of evaluation within seven calendar days of posting or receipt. No challenge will be considered or adjustment made after that period.

Make-Up Examinations

Make-up examinations for excused absences from exams must be taken within 10 school days of the students’ return to school. Students must contact in writing the appropriate course coordinators within two school days (no later than 3:00 P.M. on the second day) of their return to school to schedule the time and date of the makeup examinations. If there is insufficient time to take the make-up examinations, because of conflicts with scheduled examinations, the make-up examinations must be taken within two school days of the conclusion of regularly scheduled examinations. Students’ failure to adhere to the aforementioned timelines will result in the loss of their eligibility for a make-up exam. Students will receive zero points for the exam. The format of the make-up exam is at the discretion of the course coordinator.

Immunizations

Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine requires that all accepted and continuing students admitted toward the conferral of the Doctor of Podiatric Medicine degree have current immunizations as a condition of affiliation with the college. 

In order to ensure that all students are protected against preventable communicable illness, the following requirements must be met prior to matriculation or within 60 days of classes starting. In addition, students must maintain compliance while enrolled at Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine. Continuing students must comply with all immunization updates and be mindful of any immunizations that may expire while enrolled as a student. It is the student's responsibility to become and maintain compliant on all required immunizations. Students who fail to maintain compliance may be removed from classroom and/or clinical settings (including clerkships) until the student can provide proof of compliance. 

Students may not opt out of required immunizations. Students who are allergic to a vaccine ingredient, or who may have a medical condition which prevents the administration of a vaccine, must provide a health care provider's note. This note should be supplied to Case Western Reserve University Health Services. In addition the student should maintain a copy of this note for their records, as the student may need to supply it to clinical sites. Students may not be allowed on rotations or clerkships if all immunization requirements are not met. 

Kent State College of Podiatric Medicine has partnered with University Health Services at Case Western Reserve University to provide health services to all KSUCPM students. University Health Services also maintains a record of a student's immunization records. It is strongly recommended  that students make a copy of all immunization records prior to sending them to University Health Services. Students should keep all records of immunizations so that they can be provided to residency programs, hospitals or other medical institutions following graduation. 

All incoming students must provide documentation of the immunizations listed below prior to orientation or within 60 days of matriculation. Students should begin to review the immunizations listed below with a physician upon admission to the program. Students are strongly advised to begin receiving immunizations and/or titers that they may need and collecting documentation upon admission to the program. Students will submit documentation of immunization records to University Health Services once they receive the Medical Health Packet in the spring, prior to the first fall semester at Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine. The Medical Health Packet will be available via e-mail and mail in early June. A physician will need to fill out the immunization form, which is included in the packet. Students should not send any immunization records to University Health Services prior to receiving the Medical Health Packet. 

Required Immunizations for Kent State University College of Podiatric Medicine students

1st Year

  • Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap)
    • One Tdap vaccine within the past 10 years. Td will not be accepted. 
    • Must be current all four years. 
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)
    • Vaccine 1 dose if born before 01/01/1957; 2 doses if born on or after 01/01/1957. Minimum 4 weeks apart between Dose 1 and Dose 2. 
    • Positive Rubella titer required OR
    • Positive Rubeola IgG Titer, and Positive Mumps IgG Titer
  • Hepatitis B
    • 3 doses required. Dose 1 to Dose 2: minimum 4 weeks apart; Dose 2 to Dose 3: minimum 8 weeks apart (and at least 16 weeks after first dose) AND
    • Hep B sAB Titer - Positive

The Hepatitis B series can take up to six months to complete. Students are advised to begin this series upon admission to the program. 

  • Varicella
    • 2 doses required. Minimum 4 weeks apart between Dose 1 to Dose 2 OR
    • Positive Varicella Zoster IgG Titer
  • Influenza (Vaccination required annually)
  • Tuberculosis screening (PPD)
    • Two TB skin tests (PPD) performed in the 12 months prior to starting classes, with the second PPD performed less than 3 months prior to the start. These must be done in the United States OR
    • A blood test, Interferon Gamma Release Assay (Quantiferon-TB Gold In-Tube or T-Spot), performed less than 3 months prior to starting class. 
      • An IGRA is required for thise with past BCG vaccine who have tested positive with a PPD, unless they have a positive IGRA in the past. 
      • A chest x-ray is required for the positive TB testing (PPD or IGRA).
      • Provide copies of reports for chest x-rays, blood tests, TB treatment statement, and PPD results. 

Continuing students are responsible for obtaining the following immunizations so they remain compliant with KSUCPM requirements:

2nd Year:

  • Influenza
  • Tuberculosis screening

3rd Year:

  • Influenza
  • Tuberculosis screening

4th Year:

  • Influenza
  • Tuberculosis screening

Below is a list of strongly recommended immunizations for KSUCPM students:
1st Year:

  • Meningococcal 
  • Hepatitis A
  • Human papillomavirus 
    • (HPV2, HPV4)
  • Polio

Some clerkships/externships may require additional immunizations. Please check with the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics to determine if there are any additional immunization requirements. 

Immunization requirements are subject to change. 

Incomplete Grades

Grades of incomplete may be assigned by the course course or rotation instructor. Students will have no more than ninety (90) days from the posting of the incomplete grade to satisfy the requirements as outlined by the course or rotation coordinator. The course or rotation coordinator will notify the student of the specific time frame for satisfying the requirements necessary to remove the incomplete grade. This time frame, including and and all deadlines, is at the discretion of the course or rotation coordinator, but may not exceed ninety (90) days from the posting of the incomplete grade. Exceptions may be granted by the rotation coordinator for students in the 4th Year who are out of town on external clinical rotations for a period exceeding ninety (90) days. In this event, the rotation coordinator will assign an extended deadline that the student will be required to meet. Extension of deadlines for 4th Year students may only be granted for CLI 804xx rotations. 

All grades of incomplete will be converted to failing grades (F or U) after the ninety (90) days, or at the end of the extended period assigned by the rotation coordinator for 4th Year students out of town on external clinical rotations.

Laboratory Participation During Pregnancy

There are many chemicals used in the Anatomy Laboratory in association with cadaver dissection. Some of these chemicals are known respiratory irritants and carcinogens and some can cause central nervous system disorders. Therefore, if a student knows that she is pregnant, suspects she is pregnant or is contemplating becoming pregnant, she is not permitted to be in the Anatomy Laboratory. Any student in this situation should immediately notify the division head of basic sciences to discuss her options.

Academic Option

  1. Incoming student can choose to delay entry and enter the four-year program the following August
  2. Student can take a one year leave of absence.

Medical Option

  1. The college will send a letter to the student which:
    1. Explains the College Pregnancy Policy;
    2. Contains the Material Safety Data Sheets required by Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards, describing the major chemicals that the student and her unborn child would he exposed to in the Anatomy Laboratory;
    3. Instructs the student to give these sheets to her obstetrician for review;
    4. Informs the student that without written permission from the obstetrician directly responsible for her care, the student will not be permitted in the Anatomy Laboratory; and
    5. Informs the student that the obstetrician directly responsible for the student’s care must send a letter bearing his/her signature to the senior associate dean of academic affairs and to the division head of basic science.
  2. The obstetrician directly responsible for the student’s care must send a letter to the dean of the College of Podiatric Medicine and the division head of basic science, which contains the following elements:
    1. The obstetrician has read the initial letter from the college that was sent to the student;
    2. The obstetrician has read all of the Material Safety Data Sheets; and
    3. The obstetrician clearly states that in his/her judgment, it is safe for the student and her unborn child to spend
      1. four, and frequently more, hours per week in the Anatomy Lab for Gross Anatomy, and/or
      2. six, and frequently more, hours per week in the Anatomy Lab for Lower Extremity Anatomy and/or
      3. any time while pregnant, during her four years at College of Podiatric Medicine, in the Anatomy Lab.
  3. If the college receives the physician’s letter and all of the above criteria have been met, then the student will be urged to implement the following precautions while in the lab:
    1. Comply with any and all protocols required by her physician; and
    2. Purchase (at student’s own expense) and wear while in the lab:
      1. a dual cartridge respirator or a PAPR system respirator or a device/mask that provides similar protection,
      2. Nitrile gloves and
      3. Tyvek coveralls.

Leave of Absence Procedure

For the university policy on Leave of Absence for Graduate Studies, please refer to the Academic Policies section of this Catalog.

A currently enrolled student at the College of Podiatric Medicine is entitled to request a leave of absence when his/her personal life situation necessitates such a request. A leave of absence is an excused absence (one-day to a maximum of 30 calendar days) from scheduled course and/or clinical responsibilities. In rare instances of severe illness and prolonged hospitalization, the senior associate dean of student affairs can authorize a one-time extension of leave for an additional 30 calendar days per academic year. The request for an additional 30-day extension must be substantiated with the appropriate medical records submitted to the senior associate dean. A student who is granted a leave of absence due to psychological, emotional or other like reasons will be required to be evaluated by a counselor or physician, either of the college's choice or approved by the college, prior to return, ensuring the student is able to fully meet educational and/or clinical obligations.

Below are the procedures to requesting an official leave of absence.

  1. Student secures the Leave of Absence form from Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics, completes the form, returns it to and meets with the Director or Assistant Director of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics. Any request form received without a complete explanation and supporting documentation for the request will be automatically denied.
  2. If the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics approves the request for leave, all appropriate faculty and staff members will be notified of the approval and the intended return date. 
  3. Upon returning from the approved leave of absence, the student meets with the Director or Assistant Director of the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics to secure the “Return from Leave” form, completes the form and returns the completed form, along with supporting documentation, to the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics. Once the return is approved, all appropriate faculty and staff members will be notified. 

NOTE: Any requests for a leave of absence longer than 60 consecutive days will be viewed as “Withdrawal” from the college and requested as such on the appropriate form secured from the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics. It is important to note that even though a currently enrolled student is on a leave of absence, the granting of the leave does not constitute a waiver of the student’s responsibility for tuition, fees or academic assignments.

Upon returning from a leave of absence, a student is required to make up any eligible missed assignments or examinations within 10 school days of the student's return. Students must contact in writing the appropriate course coordinators within two school days (no later than 3:00 PM on the second day) of their return to school to schedule the time and date of the makeup assignments and examinations. If there is insufficient time to complete the make-up assignments and examinations due to conflicts with other scheduled examinations, the make-up assignments and examinations must be taken within two school days of the conclusion of regularly scheduled examination period. Failure to adhere to the aforementioned timelines will result in the loss of students' eligibility to complete missed assignments and examinations, resulting in zero points for all assignments and examinations. The format of make-up assignments and examinations is at the sole discretion of the course coordinator. 

Professional Behavior

Professional behavior is expected at all times on campus, in clinic, during college events, and while on outside rotations. If behavior is deemed unprofessional by a member of staff or faculty, the student will be subject to a Professionalism Deficiency Evaluation and possible further disciplinary actions.

In addition, if behavior in clinic is deemed unprofessional by a member of faculty, the student will be asked to leave the clinic and will be charged with an unexcused absence.
See the section on Professionalism Deficiency Evaluations for additional information.

Professionalism Deficiency Evaluation

Professional behavior is expected at all times. Any member of the administration, faculty or staff may initiate a Professionalism Deficiency Evaluation proceeding. Students receiving three Professionalism Deficiency Evaluations during their time at the College of Podiatric Medicine may be subject to possible dismissal from the program. The initiator of the Professionalism Deficiency Evaluation must describe events or circumstances that show that student behavior, on college property or at college functions, is unsatisfactory. Students missing assigned deadlines or mandatory college meetings/events will also be subject to a Professionalism Deficiency Evaluation. Students receiving a first Professionalism Deficiency Evaluation will be required to appear at the college for a meeting with the initiator and a witness. This witness may include a staff supervisor or faculty member. A second Professionalism Deficiency Evaluation notice will result in a meeting with the senior associate dean.

If a student receives a third Professionalism Deficiency Evaluation, the student will be subject to further disciplinary actions, including the possibility of dismissal from the college. In addition, a student receiving a professionalism deficiency evaluation may be subject to additional disciplinary actions, including dismissal from the program, regardless of how many evaluations he or she has previously received. All professionalism deficiencies will be retained for one year post-graduation in the college’s Office of Student Academic Services, with the exception of students who have received three Professionalism Deficiency Evaluations. Students receiving three Professionalism Deficiency Evaluations will have the evaluations retained in their permanent file. The student is instructed to sign the form as an acknowledgement of having read it. The student signature does not constitute an admission of agreement with the Professionalism Deficiency Evaluation. The student has the right to prepare a response.

The following is a list of expectations of all students in regards to professional behavior:

  1. Reliability and responsibility
  2. Maturity
  3. Ability to accept criticism and take appropriate steps to correct shortcomings
  4. Communication professionally and appropriately, both orally and in writing
  5. Honesty and integrity
  6. Demonstrating respect for patients and/or members of college community
  7. Appearance and grooming that demonstrate professionalism

Promotion

In order to be eligible for promotion, students are required to maintain a satisfactory level of scholarship, performance and competence. Written, oral and practical examinations, unannounced quizzes, clinical observations, completion of performance objectives and other evaluative procedures in all areas of the curriculum will be used to assess students’ progress. Students are advised that clinical rotations are weighed like courses for purposes of promotion decisions.

The following criteria apply:

  1. Students who achieve an F (fail) or U (unsatisfactory) grade in a course or rotation will carry the F or U throughout the academic year. Students who fail an additional course or rotation during a semester in which they have been placed on academic probation will be academically dismissed. Please see the Academic and Summary Dismissals section for additional details.
  2. Students falling below the minimum overall grade point average of 2.4000 following the 2nd Year spring semester will be academically dismissed.
  3. A failure in a remedial course or rotation will result in academic dismissal. Any student with two or more failures (any combination of courses or rotations) in one academic year will be academically dismissed. 
  4. Students at the end of their 4th Year will not be eligible to graduate with failures on their transcript. 

Please refer to the College of Podiatric Medicine policies on Remediation, Academic and Summary Dismissals, Eligibility for Doctor of Podiatric Medicine Degree and Remediation and Mandatory Academic Counseling for additional information. 

Readmission

Students seeking readmission to the college must contact the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics for current procedures. Students who have been officially dismissed from the college for academic reasons and who have not been offered readmission by the academic appeals committee, or students who have been dismissed for any reason other than academics, are not eligible for readmission consideration until one year from the date of dismissal. 

Students who have previously withdrawn or who have previously been academically dismissed who are seeking readmission to the program will have their appeal requests reviewed by the Academic Appeals Committee. The decision of the Academic Appeals Committee for these students is final. 

Students previously dismissed for reasons other than academics who are applying for readmission will have their request considered by the dean. The decision of the dean for these students is final. 

All students who have been readmitted with outstanding failures on their record must successfully complete the repeated courses or rotations in order to be removed from academic probation. 

Students readmitted with failures on their transcript are:

  1. Placed on academic probation with a notation being made on their transcript.
  2. On academic probation until outstanding failures have been satisfactory resolved.
  3. Subject to academic dismissal without the right to appeal if any course or rotation is failed while on academic probation.

Any student who has been dismissed (academically or otherwise) two times from the college is summarily dismissed without the right to appeal and is not eligible for readmission consideration at any time. 

Please see the Academic and Summary Dismissals policy, as well as the Academic Appeals Committee policy, in the policies section of the College of Podiatric Medicine page in the University Catalog. 

Registration for the College Podiatric Medicine

All students must complete a registration (form to be distributed by the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics) each year.

Students who fail to complete registration requirements by the assigned deadline are subject to a professionalism deficiency evaluation. Students will not be promoted to the following grade level / academic year until registration requirements are fulfilled. Once the academic year concludes, students who have not submitted the required registration paperwork for the subsequent academic year will be withdrawn from the program.

Remediation and Mandatory Academic Counseling

An F (fail) or U (unsatisfactory) grade can be remedied by receiving a satisfactory grade after remediation of a course or clinical rotation. Both the initial grade F or U and the satisfactory grade (no higher than the grade C) received after remediation are noted on the transcript. However, the original grade of F or U is not calculated into the GPA provided that the student receives a passing grade for the remedial course or rotation. Students who fail a remedial course or rotation will have both the original and remedial grades calculated into their GPA. 

Any student with one course or rotation failure will be placed on academic probation until the course is successfully remediated. Remediation of the failed course or rotation will take place during the four-week period detailed below. Please note, the four-week remediation period may continue into the next academic year.

  • Students in their first year will begin remediation immediately following the summer semester.
  • Students in their second year will begin remediation immediately following the spring semester.
  • With the exception of Pathway I students, remediation for students in their third year will begin immediately following the spring semester.
  • Remediation for APMLE Pathway I students will take place in April of the third-year summer semester following the completion of all 803xx level clinical rotations and coursework.
  • Remediation for students in their fourth year will take place beginning in May of the fourth-year summer semester.

In addition to standard tuition, students will be charged an additional fee of $750 for remediation. Failure of a remedial course or rotation will result in academic dismissal with the right of appeal, provided that the student has not previously been academically dismissed from the College of Podiatric Medicine. Students with a previous academic dismissal on their record will be academically dismissed without the right to appeal. 

Students are advised that remediation takes precedence over all other educational responsibilities.

Remediation is conducted in a manner that is at the sole discretion of the course coordinator. Prearranged personal travel is not a qualified excuse to be absent from any scheduled meeting or examination.

Failure in any course or rotation (including the remedial course) in a semester in which the student is on academic probation will lead to academic dismissal with the right to appeal, provided that the student has not previously been academically dismissed from the College of Podiatric Medicine. Students with a previous academic dismissal on their record will be summarily dismissed without the right to appeal. 

In addition to the above policies regarding failed courses and rotations, students are required to meet the following grade point average minimums during the first and second year (effective for students whose first semester of coursework in the DPM program is fall 2016 or later):

  • Minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.500 at the end of the 1st Year fall semester, minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.500 at the end of the 1st Year spring semester, and minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.500 at the end of the 1st Year summer semester. 
  • Minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.500 at the end of the 2nd Year fall semester and minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.400 at the end of the 2nd Year spring semester. 

Students falling below the minimum grade point average following the 1st Year fall, 1st Year spring, 1st Year summer or 2nd Year fall will be required to participate in mandatory academic counseling. As part of this counseling, students will be required to meet specific requirements, including but not limited to the completion of assignments and/or practice examinations, attendance at all required meetings, participation in assigned tutoring and attendance at all tutoring sessions, and any other requirements designated by the dean, the senior associate dean and/or the academic resources director.

Students who do not attend scheduled meetings or who do not complete all requirements by assigned deadlines are subject to academic and/or disciplinary actions. Please refer to the Professionalism Deficiency Evaluation policy in the College of Podiatric Medicine policies section of the University Catalog.

Academic Dismissal

Students below the minimum overall GPA of 2.400 at the conclusion of the 2nd Year spring semester will be academically dismissed with the right to appeal - provided that the student has not previously been dismissed (academic or otherwise) from the College of Podiatric Medicine. Students with a previous dismissal on their record will be academically dismissed without the right to appeal. Please refer to the Academic and Summary Dismissals policy in the College of Podiatric Medicine policies section of the University Catalog for more information. 

Students with an overall GPA below 2.400 at the conclusion of the 2nd Year spring semester who are granted readmission to the program by the Academic Appeals Committee will be required to participate in mandatory academic counseling during the entirety of their 3rd Year. Please refer to the Academic Appeals Committee policy in the College of Podiatric Medicine policies section of the University Catalog for more information. 

Senior Experience

Senior Experience takes place during the fourth-year summer semester and includes CMD 80424: Business Administration, CLI 80585: Senior Competency, and the possibility of additional lectures and workshops. Students will be sent a schedule prior to the start of the Senior Experience.

Attendance at all Senior Experience activities and events is mandatory.
Students may also request to supplement their Senior Experience with elective clinical rotations. Prior approval from the Dean is required for completion of any elective clinical rotation during the fourth-year Senior Experience.

Student Conduct

A finding of responsibility for violating college or university policy will lead to a review by the dean of the college and may result in summary dismissal from the program. The decision of the dean is final. 

Student Malpractice Insurance Coverage

Students are covered only by the College of Podiatric Medicine’s malpractice insurance policy while participating in direct patient care in college-approved clinical rotations in the college’s clinics and other affiliated clinics, hospitals and doctor’s offices. Malpractice insurance coverage is limited to college-approved rotations.

The college’s malpractice insurance policy does not provide coverage for students who, in their free time, choose to visit, work voluntarily or are otherwise privately employed in clinics, hospitals or physicians’ offices. While visits are permitted, students are strongly advised to limit their activities strictly to observation. If students participate in direct patient care outside of a scheduled rotation, they do so at their own risk.

Practicing podiatric medicine (i.e. diagnosing or treating patients) outside of the college’s approved clinical programs is strictly forbidden and will lead to disciplinary action.

Test Review Procedure

Students may review an examination only by appointment with the course coordinator, and only for a period extending for two weeks following the conclusion of the exam period. Extensions to this deadline are at the sole discretion of the course coordinator. It is the decision of the course coordinator as to the manner in which the review takes place. 

Transfer and Advanced Standing Admissions

Advanced Standing is credit(s) granted by a college to a student for studies completed elsewhere (i.e., another podiatry college or accredited medical school). Students will only be considered for Transfer and Advanced Standing prior to matriculation.

Candidates who have had successful attendance at another college of podiatric medicine or an accredited medical school and are in good academic and personal standing may apply to Kent State’s College of Podiatric Medicine for transfer and/or advanced standing.

Candidates interested in transfer/advanced standing admission must meet the criteria for initial admission as outlined in the academic requirements section and follow the procedures outlined below:

  • Submit a statement to the college’s Office of Enrollment Management requesting transfer/advanced standing consideration. The statement should outline the reasons for requesting transfer and/or advanced standing.
  • Provide an official transcript of academic performance in all undergraduate, graduate and professional programs of study, domestic and international. If there was international institutional enrollment, reports from a recognized foreign credentialing agency must be jointly submitted for full consideration.
  • Provide a letter of status from the academic dean or dean of student affairs at the podiatric medicine college or other accredited medical school currently being attended. Official transcripts must indicate minimum 3.500 GPA from previous podiatric college for transfer consideration.

Withdrawal from the College of Podiatric Medicine

Policies governing withdrawal from the college are predicated on the following definitions: A student who requests withdrawal prior to the seventh week of the semester withdraws from the program with the notation “W” and no grades recorded on his/her transcript. In order to return to the college, students must reapply, following the application procedures established by the college. Student who request withdrawal after seven weeks of course instruction will receive the notation “WP” on their transcript for each course/rotation if passing, or the notation “WF” if failing. In order to return to the college, students must reapply, following the application procedures administered by the college.

The correct procedure to follow for a student wishing to withdraw with either classification is as follows:

  1. A student wishing to withdraw secures the “Withdrawal Form” from the senior associate dean, completes the form, returns the completed form to the senior associate dean and arranges an appointment to meet with the senior associate dean.
  2. After meeting with the senior associate dean, the student must meet with a representative in library services to determine if any fines have been incurred, and if so, to make arrangements to have them paid.
  3. The student must arrange to have an “exit interview” with the financial aid personnel. This interview is required under various federal statutes for borrowers of funds with federal subsidies and is, therefore, mandatory.
  4. The student must meet with the Director of Operations to turn in student identification card and parking pass.
  5. After securing the necessary approvals on the Withdrawal Request form, the student returns the completed and approved forms to the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics for final authorization by the director or assistant director. 

NOTE: The official date of withdrawal is the date on which the student begins the withdrawal process. Approval will only be granted by the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics if all other signatures and approvals have been affixed to the Withdrawal Request form.

A student who leaves the college without proper notice or without following the withdrawal policy will automatically be withdrawn from the college by the Office of Academic Services and Enrollment Analytics after two attempts to contact the student without an adequate response or failure to respond.

Upon return to campus duties from either a medical withdrawal or personal leave of absence, the college administrators may request a third-party assessment to meet compliance that the student is in full readiness for “return to campus,” ensuring the student is able to fully meet educational and/or clinical obligations. This intent serves to protect the student, the college and the greater community. All efforts will be made to maintain confidentiality and discretion for all involved parties.

For more information on Kent State University’s policies and procedures for grading, please refer to the Academic Policies section in this Catalog.

College of Podiatric Medicine Faculty

  • Belovich, Stephanie J. (2012), Ph.D., Associate Professor, Kent State University, 1999
  • Blazer, Marie (2012), Associate Professor, D.P.M., Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, 2004
  • Bodman, Myron (2012), Associate Professor, D.P.M., Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, 2004
  • Boike, Allan M. (2014), Professor and Dean
  • Ehredt, Duane (2015), Assistant Professor, D.P.M., Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, 2015
  • Hethertington, Vincent J. (2012), Professor and Senior Associate Dean
  • Johnson, Rachel E. (2012), Assistant Professor, D.P.M., Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, 2008
  • Kawalec, Jill (2012), Associate Professor, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University, 1997
  • Mooney, Mary A. (2012), Assistant Professor, M.D., The Ohio State University, 1979
  • Osbourne, Abe (2012), Associate Professor, D.P.M., Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, 1990
  • Osher, Lawrence (2012), Professor, D.P.M., Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, 1982
  • Petrozzi, Rocco (2012), Associate Professor, D.P.M., Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, 2003
  • Ruszkowski, Leslee (2015), Assistant Professor, D.P.M., Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, 2013
  • Siesel, Kathy (2012), Associate Professor, D.P.M., Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, 1989
  • Spencer, Scott (2012), Associate Professor, D.P.M., Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, 1987
  • Whitaker, Jeffery M. (2013), Associate Professor, D.P.M., Samuel Merritt College, 2001
  • Wright, E. Ronald (2015), Professor, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University, 2003

Clinical Education (CLI)

CLI 80200     STANDARDIZED PATIENTS ROTATION      1 Credit Hour

Offers second year students the opportunity to interview standardized patients and receive feedback on their patient interviewing and history recording ski8lls which prepares them to function competently in a doctor/patient encounter. Some students find that interviewing patients comes naturally, while for others it is more a learned skill. The standardized patients are actors who have been coached to simulate actual patients so accurately that the simulation could possibly fool even a skilled clinician.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 4 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

CLI 80310     PODIATRIC SURGERY ROTATION      4 Credit Hours

Stresses complete pre-operative and post-operative management of the surgical patient. Many foot deformities can be corrected with surgery. Work up for the purposes of establishing proper diagnosis, selection of appropriate surgical procedure and designing a proper follow-up plan are necessary components of successful surgical outcome. Proper post-operative patient care as well as early recognition of potential surgical complications are stressed. These are essential to a successful surgical practice. While the scope of surgery varies greatly with differences in postgraduate training, there exists a basic core of knowledge and various techniques that are consistent with successful surgical outcome. In order to be a successful surgeon, it is imperative that the student master those basic skills that will be utilized through his or her career. This rotation is the foundation upon which surgical careers are built.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 16 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

CLI 80315     SURGICAL SKILLS WORKSHOP      4 Credit Hours

Provides students with the knowledge and hands-on training pertaining to the physical skills that are necessary to perform surgery of the foot and ankle. An effort is made to correlate didactic information learned in the classroom with the rationale behind why many surgical procedures are performed. Adequate demonstration of surgical skills are provided along with practice time and constructive performance feedback.

Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 16 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

CLI 80320     RADIOLOGY ROTATION      4 Credit Hours

Clinical rotations function by adapting and applying classroom information to real life, “hands-on” situations. A majority of foot complaints necessitate the taking and the reading of radiographs. As specialists of the foot and ankle, podiatrists are in a unique situation in being able to take and interpret radiographs in their own offices. Radiographic analysis is therefore and integral component of podiatric medical education. The Radiology/Medical Imaging rotation focuses on those skills commonly performed by the podiatrist. This includes positioning and developing radiographs along with recognizing the most common pedal pathologies.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 16 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

CLI 80351     PODIATRIC MEDICINE/BIOMECHANICS (EUCLID)      4 Credit Hours

Gives students the opportunity to perform primary foot and ankle care under the supervision of the clinical faculty. Students learn basic podiatric palliative care techniques on patients, as well as how to record the findings in the medical record. Students are evaluated on their ability to present the case history, treat the patient and properly record their findings. Students receive clinical conferences on a variety of podiatric medical topics with practical exams in many areas. Two months are spent at the Cleveland Foot and Ankle Institute. One month is spent at the Cleveland VA Hospital. This rotation also provides the student with the opportunity for observation and practice of examination skills required in performing a musculoskeletal and biomechanical evaluation. This involves the development of skill in obtaining a biomechanical/musculoskeletal history, arthrometric evaluation, visual gait analysis and musculoskeletal examination to include muscle strength testing, flexibility and range of motion. The student is also taught, and provided opportunities for practice, various methods of obtaining and evaluating proper biomechanical cast impressions of the feet for the purpose of fabricating orthotic devices, Emphasis in this rotation is on the practice and refinement of clinical evaluation and manual skills.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 16 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

CLI 80352     PODIATRIC MEDICINE/BIOMECHANICS (INDEPENDENCE)      4 Credit Hours

Gives students the opportunity to perform primary foot and ankle care under the supervision of the clinical faculty. Students learn basic podiatric palliative care techniques on patients, as well as how to record their findings in the medical record. Students are evaluated on their ability to present the case history, treat the patient and properly record their findings. Students receive clinical conferences on a variety of podiatric medical topics, with practical exams in many areas. Two months are spent at the Cleveland Foot and Ankle Institute. One month is spent at the Cleveland VA Hospital. Also provides the student with the opportunity for observation and practice of examination skills required in performing a musculoskeletal and biomechanical evaluation. This involves the development of skill in obtaining a biomechanical/musculoskeletal history, arthrometic evaluation, visual gait analysis and musculoskeletal examination to include muscle strength testing, flexibility and range of motion. The student is also taught, and provided opportunities for practice, various methods of obtaining and evaluating proper biomechanical cast impressions of the feet for the purpose of fabricating orthotic devices. Emphasis is on the practice and refinement of clinical evaluation and manual skills.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 16 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

CLI 80365     PRIMARY CARE/VETERANS ADMINISTRATION      4 Credit Hours

This is a one-month rotation at a veteran’s health care facility, which emphasizes the skills necessary to function effectively in government health care facilities.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 16 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

CLI 80370     HISTORY AND PHYSICAL ROTATION      4 Credit Hours

The history and physical rotation is a one month experience in one of the several area hospitals, which is designed to provide experience in history and physical examinations. Each rotation site will provide the same core experiences, (based on the goals and objectives), in patient assessment techniques (i.e., history and physical examination), the understanding of disease processes and management strategies. In addition to the core experiences, each rotation site may add additional exposures and training.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 16 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

CLI 80380     SIMULATED PATIENTS I      4 Credit Hours

Clinical course offered as part of the core clinical rotations in the third year. Covers general medicine rotation, simulated patients interactions and clinical skills exam exposure.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 4 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory-IP

CLI 80381     SIMULATED PATIENTS II      4 Credit Hours

Clinical course offered as part of the core clinical rotations in the third year. Covers general medicine rotation, simulated patients interactions and clinical skills exam exposure.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 4 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory-IP

CLI 80441     SENIOR CLINICAL ROTATION I      4 Credit Hours

The senior podiatric rotation is a one-month rotation at the Cleveland Foot and Ankle Institute, which emphasizes competencies needed to enter hospital residency training. Experiences are gained in primary clinical sites and external sites affiliated with the college.

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program in order to register for this course.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 48 other

Grade Mode: Standard Letter-S/U-IP

CLI 80442     SENIOR CLINICAL ROTATION II      4 Credit Hours

The senior podiatric rotation is a one-month rotation at the Cleveland Foot and Ankle Institute, whcih emphasized competencies needed to enter hospital residency traning. Experiences are gained in primary clinical sites and external sites affiliated with the college.

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program in order to register for this course.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 48 other

Grade Mode: Standard Letter-S/U-IP

CLI 80445     SENIOR ROTATION VETERANS ADMINISTRATION HOSPITAL      4 Credit Hours

Designed to provide clinical experiences in primary care management, treatment, and problem solving for that special population in the VA medical center, Brecksville nursing home environment and extended care facilities. This rotation also gives the students the opportunity to gain experience by providing care to the medically disenfranchised veterans. Additionally, intensive educational opportunities are offered to evaluate and treat various degrees of chronic and acute wounds, as well as offer some surgical experience. Finally all students are offered an opportunity to participate in a specialized surgical clinic, designed to be interactive and skills oriented, followed by surgical case presentations and group discussions.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 16 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

CLI 80455     COMMUNITY MEDICINE/MEDICAL IMAGING ROTATION      4 Credit Hours

In addition to the rotations on campus, the college operates several community medicine clinics in various sites throughout the city of Cleveland to full the college’s commitment to serve the community. Students are assigned to these clinics and treat patients under the supervision of members of the clinical faculty. Students are afforded the opportunity to provide care and develop an understanding and appreciation of community based health problems. Also included is training in various imagining modalities including plain film radiography, MRI and CT scanning.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 16 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

CLI 80460     CLERKSHIP ROTATION I      4 Credit Hours

Designed to enhance the clinical education and patient exposure of the podiatric medical student. This interdisciplinary training affords students an opportunity to share and expand their knowledge with experience members of the health care team in Cleveland and around the country. Office and hospital based programs available in almost every state, offer a diversity of clinical experiences. Students are expected to participate in a minimum of five months of external rotations during their fourth year. An orientation is conducted and a complete handbook of information is provided to the third year student to assist in this important educational process.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 4 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory-IP

CLI 80465     CLERKSHIP ROTATION II      4 Credit Hours

Designed to enhance the clinical education and patient exposure of the podiatric medical student. This interdisciplinary training affords students an opportunity to share and expand their knowledge with experience members of the health care team in Cleveland and around the country. Office and hospital based programs available in almost every state, offer a diversity of clinical experiences. Students are expected to participate in a minimum of five months of external rotations during their fourth year. An orientation is conducted and a complete handbook of information is provided to the third year student to assist in this important educational process.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 4 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory-IP

CLI 80470     CLERKSHIP ROTATION III      4 Credit Hours

Designed to enhance the clinical education and patient exposure of the podiatric medical student. This interdisciplinary training affords students an opportunity to share and expand their knowledge with experience members of the health care team in Cleveland and around the country. Office and hospital based programs available in almost every state, offer a diversity of clinical experiences. Students are expected to participate in a minimum of five months of external rotations during their fourth year. An orientation is conducted and a complete handbook of information is provided to the third year student to assist in this important educational process.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 4 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory-IP

CLI 80475     CLERKSHIP ROTATION IV      4 Credit Hours

Designed to enhance the clinical education and patient exposure of the podiatric medical student. This interdisciplinary training affords students an opportunity to share and expand their knowledge with experience members of the health care team in Cleveland and around the country. Office and hospital based programs available in almost every state, offer a diversity of clinical experiences. Students are expected to participate in a minimum of five months of external rotations during their fourth year. An orientation is conducted and a complete handbook of information is provided to the third year student to assist in this important educational process.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 4 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory-IP

CLI 80480     CLERKSHIP ROTATION V      4 Credit Hours

Designed to enhance the clinical education and patient exposure of the podiatric medical student. This interdisciplinary training affords students an opportunity to share and expand their knowledge with experience members of the health care team in Cleveland and around the country. Office and hospital based programs available in almost every state, offer a diversity of clinical experiences. Students are expected to participate in a minimum of five months of external rotations during their fourth year. An orientation is conducted and a complete handbook of information is provided to the third year student to assist in this important educational process.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 4 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory-IP

CLI 80485     CLERKSHIP ROTATION VI      4 Credit Hours

Designed to enhance the clinical education and patient exposure of the podiatric medical student. This interdisciplinary training affords students an opportunity to share and expand their knowledge with experience members of the health care team in Cleveland and around the country. Office and hospital based programs available in almost every state, offer a diversity of clinical experiences. Students are expected to participate in a minimum of five months of external rotations during their fourth year. An orientation is conducted and a complete handbook of information is provided to the third year student to assist in this important educational process.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 4 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory-IP

CLI 80521     SENIOR MEDICINE ROTATION I      4 Credit Hours

One month external rotation at an area hospital. Students are instructed in skills, values and knowledge necessary to perform a complete medical history and physical. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) graded.

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program in order to register for this course.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 48 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory-IP

CLI 80522     SENIOR MEDICINE ROTATION II      4 Credit Hours

One-month external rotation at an area hospital. Students are instructed in skills, values and knowledge necessary to perform a complete medical history and physical. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) graded.

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program in order to register for this course.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 48 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory-IP

CLI 80585     SENIOR COMPETENCY      2 Credit Hours

A multiple station Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), to be held during March, April and May at the end of the M4 medical year. Students are required to take the exam. Students are expected to correctly answer or achieve a minimum of 75 percent of all questions/cases/skills to achieve mastery. Any student failing to achieve 75 percent of the total questions is required to repeat the entire exam. Students failing to demonstrate mastery of the material after two exams receive an unsatisfactory grade on their transcript for CLI 440 and CLI 498. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) graded.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Clinic

Contact Hours: 2 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory-IP

Community Medicine (CMD)

CMD 80325     PUBLIC HEALTH JURISPRUDENCE      2 Credit Hours

Presents issues of concern to the practicing podiatrist and includes; the development of public health in America, disease prevention and control, environmental effects on health and disease, substance abuse, the role of the federal government in the provision of public health, the US health care system, occupational medicine, women’s health issues, ethics in podiatric medicine and medical jurisprudence.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

CMD 80424     BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION      2 Credit Hours

This course presents issues of concern to the podiatrist about to enter medical practice. Topics include the complete scope of business issues necessary to prepare the student to compete in a changing medical marketplace.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

General Medicine (GMD)

GMD 80121     PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT AND DIAGNOSIS      3 Credit Hours

Physiology and physical assessment are coordinated to allow students to integrate the underlying physiologic processes with physical diagnostic findings. Physiologic is a study of the basic concepts of normal organ and organ system function. Emphasis is placed on regulatory functions of each organ or system as well as the contribution of each to the whole body homeostasis. Physical diagnosis combines the patient’s symptoms and signs to arrive at a diagnosis of disease. Focus is on total body examination using the traditional processes of inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Laboratory, Lecture

Contact Hours: .73 lecture, 2.27 lab

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

GMD 80314     NEUROLOGY      2 Credit Hours

A comprehensive study of neurological diseases that are pertinent to treatment of the podiatric patient. Includes etiologies, diagnosis and treatment of the neurologic diseases.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

GMD 80315     DERMATOLOGY      2 Credit Hours

Series of lectures on dermatologic manifestations of systemic diseases. Includes the etiology, diagnosis, treatment and management of dermatologic disorders.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

GMD 80316     MEDICINE I      4 Credit Hours

The podiatric physician is an integral part of the medical team. The podiatric physician must be able to recognize systemic medical problems that manifest in the lower extremity and interface with other health care professionals for optimal Patient care. The podiatric medical/surgical resident must be able To diagnose and treat all medical diseases under the direction of an attending physician in each individual specialty, as does any other medical resident in post graduate training. Medicine GMO 80316 and GMO 80326 are divided into 8 blocks of internal medicine specialties including cardiovascular/pulmonary medicine, endocrinology, hematology/oncology, nephrology, infectious disease, rheumatology/immunology, gastrointestinal medicine, and emergency medicine. GMO 80316 emphasizes Cardiovascular/pulmonary medicine, endocrinology, infectious disease, and rheumatology/immunology. This course prepares podiatric medical students to enter clinical training experiences in the internal medicine specialties. The course emphasizes concepts and integrates knowledge from traditional science disciplines in the context of clinical application.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 4 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

GMD 80326     MEDICINE II      4 Credit Hours

The podiatric physician is an integral part of the medical team. The podiatric physician must be able to recognize systemic medical problems that manifest in the lower extremity and interface with other health care professionals for optimal Patient care. The podiatric medical/surgical resident must be able to diagnose and treat all medical diseases under the direction of an attending physician in each individual specialty, as does any other medical resident in post graduate training. Medicine GMO 80316 and GMO 80326 are divided into 8 blocks of internal medicine specialties including cardiovascular/pulmonary medicine, endocrinology, hematology/oncology, nephrology, infectious disease, rheumatology/immunology, gastrointestinal medicine, and emergency medicine. GMO 80326 emphasizes emergency medicine, Nephrology, Hematology/Oncology, and Gastrointestinal medicine. This course prepares podiatric medical students to enter clinical training experiences in the internal medicine specialties. The course emphasizes concepts and integrates knowledge from traditional science disciplines in the context of clinical application.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 4 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

GMD 80327     BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE      1 Credit Hour

Behavioral medicine is a series of lectures on major topics in the area including mood and anxiety disorders, alcoholism, substance abuse, psychoses and pain management. The presentations relate the relevance to the practice of podiatry.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 1 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

GMD 80328     WOMEN'S HEALTH      1 Credit Hour

Seminar covering important areas unique to women including pregnancy, contraception, infertility, cardiovascular health, osteoporosis and menopause.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 1 lecture

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

Podiatric Biomechanics/Orthopedics (ORT)

ORT 80131     BIOMECHANICS I      3 Credit Hours

Biomechanics is a comprehensive course, which stresses normal gait and foot function. Abnormalities in gair of foot mechanics are related to foot pathology.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 3 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ORT 80132     REHABILITATIVE MEDICINE      2 Credit Hours

Rehabilitative Medicine reviews various physical therapy modalities and principles of rehabilitation. Examples of application of these principles as relating to foot pathology are given.

Prerequisite: enrollend in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ORT 80211     BIOMECHANICS II      2 Credit Hours

Biomechanics II introduces common foot pathologies and their affects on function. The examination techniques utilized in the evaluation of patients are introduced as is the use of foot orthotic devices and computers in the assessment of biomechanical pathology.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ORT 80314     PODOPEDIATRICS      2 Credit Hours

Podopediatrics is a comprehensive course, which emphasizes the incidence, etiology, pathomechanics, evaluation and treatment of lower extremity pathology in children.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

ORT 80325     SPORTS MEDICINE      2 Credit Hours

Sports Medicine is a comprehensive course. Students gain an understanding of running biomechanics, shoe gear construction and evaluation, and the incidence, etiology, pathomechanics, evaluation and treatment of many lower extremity sports pathologies.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Preclinical Sciences (PCS)

PCS 80111     HUMAN ANATOMY      8 Credit Hours

The macroscopic anatomy of the upper limb, thorax, abdomen, head and neck, pelvis and perineum of the human body is described, utilizing audiovisual teaching aids and full cadaver dissection. The course is taught using a regional approach, with emphasis on structural and functional relationships. The laboratory instruction includes cadaver dissection supplemented with anatomical prosections, as well as cross-sectional anatomy and computerized educational material.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicne program.

Schedule Type: Combined Lecture and Lab

Contact Hours: 4 lecture, 4 lab

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PCS 80112     CELL AND TISSUE      5 Credit Hours

Histology is the study of the microscopic organization of the human body. Reciprocal relationships between normal structural features and their functions are emphasized. Macromolecules, organelles, cells, fundamental body tissues and organs are compared and contrasted. Light microscopic preparations are examined in laboratories, which are closely correlated with lecture topics.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Laboratory, Lecture

Contact Hours: 3 lecture, 1 lab, 1 other

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PCS 80113     STAYING ALIVE      5 Credit Hours

The study of the physical and chemical properties of the major constituents of cells and body fluids. This includes structures, functions and biochemical mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis, utilization and degradation of amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Also included are enzyme kinetics, bioenergetics, cellular communication, nutrition and biochemistry of specialized tissues and fluids.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 3 lecture, .5 lab, 1.5 other

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PCS 80114     MEDICAL GENETICS AND EMBRYOLOGY      4 Credit Hours

This course will include the basic principles of human genetics dealing with the genetic variations that impact medical practice. Molecular genetics, cytogenetics, genomics, and population genetics will be reviewed. This course will also review the major events and processes involved in normal and abnormal embryologic development of the major body organs and systems. This course is coordinated with Human Anatomy and Cell and Tissue Biology.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 4 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PCS 80124     LOWER EXTREMITY ANATOMY      8 Credit Hours

Lower extremity anatomy presents the detailed macroscopic anatomy of the lower limb. The course is augmented with radiographs, MRI, surface anatomy and cross sectional studies. The course includes an introduction to basic concepts of podiatric medicine, surgery and biomechanics. Laboratory instruction includes a detailed dissection of the lower limb, supplemented with computerized educational materials and study of natural bone specimens.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Laboratory, Lecture

Contact Hours: 4 lecture, 4 lab

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PCS 80125     NEUROBIOLOGY      3 Credit Hours

Neurobiology is the study of the structure and function of the nervous system. The course will deal with the anatomy, microscopic anatomy and physiology of the individual neurons and systems of neurons, which comprise the component parts of the nervous system. Topics will include sensory, special sensory and motor systems, the cerebral cortex, diencephalon, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord. Discussions will include reference to clinical disorders related to those structures.

Prerequisite: Student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 3 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PCS 80126     ORGAN SYSTEMS      8 Credit Hours

This course continues to elucidate the structural, chemical and functionalcomponents of the body.Muscular, blood, cardiovascular, respiratory, and renalcells, tissues, organs and their functions are studied. Regulation of these functions, interrelationships between systems and their effects on the organism and its homeostasis are detailed and investigated. Light microscopic preparations are examined in laboratories which are closely correlated with lecture topics.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 3 lecture, 1 lab, 4 other

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PCS 80128     MEDICAL MICROBIO/IMMUNOLOGY      6 Credit Hours

This course will introduce the student to the basic concepts, characteristics and techniques used in the study of the clinically significant microbic groups: viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. The structure, metabolism, genetics, control and laboratory techniques of each microbic group will be described. The roles and outcomes of these organisms in producing manifestations of human infection and disease will be investigated. This course will also introduce the student to the molecular, cellular and organismal mechanisms responsible for the human immune response system. Laboratory will provide hands on experience in staining, cultivation, identification, sensitivity testing, and immunologic techniques.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Combined Lecture and Lab

Contact Hours: 5 lecture, 1 lab

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PCS 80218     HUMAN SYSTEMS PATHOLOGY I      8 Credit Hours

The study of disease with emphasis on epidemiology, pathogenesis, natural history, morphologic appearance and relationship to clinical manifestation. Emphasis is placed on basic cellular pathologic processes (injury, inflammation and repair, neoplasia), and description of diseases organized by organ system. An introduction to the concepts of clinical decision making through the use of case studies and current clinical literature will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 8 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PCS 80219     PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS I      4 Credit Hours

Historically, the clinician was responsible for information about the sources, physical and chemical properties, compounding and dispensing of drugs. Today the practitioner’s responsibility requires the rational clinical use of therapeutic agents for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease based on an understanding of pharmacological principles. This course is designed to prepare practitioners to prescribe for maximum benefit and to recognize the clinical ramifications of concomitant drug therapy.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 4 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PCS 80228     HUMAN SYSTEMS PATHOLOGY II      8 Credit Hours

The study of disease with emphasis on epidemiology, pathogenesis, natural history, morphologic appearance and relationship to clinical manifestation. Emphasis is placed on basic cellular pathologic processes (injury, inflammation and repair, neoplasia), and description of diseases organized by organ system. An introduction to the concepts of clinical decision making through the use of case studies and current clinical literature will be emphasized.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 8 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PCS 80229     PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS II      4 Credit Hours

Historically, the clinician was responsible for information about the sources, physical and chemical properties, compounding and dispensing of drugs. Today the practitioner’s responsibility requires the rational clinical use of therapeutic agents for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease based on an understanding of pharmacological principles. This course is designed to prepare practitioners to prescribe for maximum benefit and to recognize the clinical ramifications of concomitant drug therapy.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 4 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Podiatric Medicine (PMD)

PMD 80113     MEDICAL ETHICS      1 Credit Hour

The focus of the medical ethics curriculum is to provide a foundation in ethical analysis, augment knowledge of contemporary bioethics issues, and offer experience applying ethical reasoning to clinical cases. The goal of this course is to promote discussion of the ethical responsibilities of a doctor to their patients.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 1 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PMD 80114     PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL RESEARCH      1 Credit Hour

It is important for a podiatric physician to have developed the ability to read and interpret the medical literature. This requires a fundamental understanding of biostatistics, epidemiology, and research design. This course provides a framework for the development of an evidence-based methodology to patient care.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 1 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PMD 80117     PODIATRY, PROFESSIONALISM AND SOCIETY I      1 Credit Hour

This introductory course is the first in a series that spans all four years of the DPM program. The subject matter is functionally relevant but nontraditional in nature with respect to classic medical education. Topics cover a wide range of subjects that podiatric medical students encounter in their academic and professional careers. Students will participate in discussions and projects on ethics, socio-behavior, and practice related topics such as professionalism, communication, and time and financial management. Other topics related to the National Board Examinations, personal health, and the changing healthcare system will also be covered. Ultimately students will develop a more unique level understanding and appreciation of the above referenced themes as they advance their learning. An emphasis on the first year of podiatric medical school is the focus of this course.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 1 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PMD 80132     LOW EXTREMITY ASSESSMENT AND DIAGNOSIS      2 Credit Hours

A comprehensive approach to physical examination, which combines the patient’s symptoms and the physical signs to arrive at a diagnosis of disease. It is accomplished by training students in the methods of history taking and physical examination. The course focuses on lower extremity examination. The traditional processes of inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation are emphasized.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Combined Lecture and Lab

Contact Hours: 1 lecture, 2 lab

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PMD 80133     INTRODUCTION MEDICAL IMAGING      1 Credit Hour

Podiatric physicians are fully licensed to order, perform and interpret radiologic studies of the foot and ankle. As operators of ionizing x-ray equipment, all practitioners must undergo basic training in x-ray physics, image control and quality assurance, safety and patient positioning. These four building blocks comprise the foundation of this course in fundamentals.

Prerequisite: student must be enrolled in the Podiatric Medicine program.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 1 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PMD 80211     PODIATRIC MEDICINE I      2 Credit Hours

This is a core course designed to present the 2nd year student with the full spectrum of pathology, which he or she will encounter during his or her clinical training and later in private practice. Topics include infectious disease, wound care, rheumatology, vascular medicine, and the diabetic foot. The student will be instructed in the evaluation of foot and ankle pathology including signs, symptoms, and differential diagnosis. Laboratory and radiographic evaluation will be discussed when appropriate. The student will also be instructed in the treatment alternatives available in each case.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PMD 80214     RADIOLOGY AND MEDICAL IMAGING I      2 Credit Hours

This course encompasses the fundamentals of modern musculoskeletal imaging, with particular emphasis on the foot and ankle. The course begins with basic principles of plain film radiographic imaging, an approach that emphasizes the correlation of abnormal findings with basis pathologic differential consideration. Lectures will then introduce the student to pedal biomechanical radiography before moving to cover the imaging topics such as the pedal arthropathies, infection and the diabetic foot. The semester will end with a detailed presentation of the diabetic neuro-osteoarthropathy (Charcot arthropathy).

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PMD 80221     PODIATRIC MEDICINE II      2 Credit Hours

This is a core course designed to present the 2nd year student with the full spectrum of pathology, which he or she will encounter during his or her clinical training and later in private practice. Topics include infectious disease, wound care, peripheral neuropathy, vascular medicine, and the diabetic foot. The student will be instructed in the evaluation of foot and ankle pathology including signs, symptoms, and differential diagnosis. Laboratory and radiographic evaluation will be discussed when appropriate. The student will also be instructed in the treatment alternatives available in each case.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PMD 80222     PODIATRIC MEDICAL SKILLS      2 Credit Hours

Podiatric Medical Skills is a practical course, which includes strapping and padding, instrument dexterity, local anesthetic injection, nail avulsion technique, blood glucose finger stick, handheld Doppler exam, fitting for diabetic shoes, arthrometric examination and casting for orthoses. Students are taught the indications and proper application of adhesive bandages and splints for the prevention of injury, control of foot function and treatment of injuries to the foot and lower extremity. Padding is the treatment of foot pathology by redistribution of weight, stress and friction. Students are taught how to relieve acute and chronic pathologies of the foot through the use of various padding materials, or prefabricated pads. Students also gain an understanding of the theory of pad placement. Students are taught the proper techniques for performing toenail avulsions, blood glucose finger sticks, and using the handheld Doppler. Students are taught the proper methods of fitting for diabetic shoes, performing a foot and ankle arthrometric examination and casting methods for foot orthoses.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Laboratory

Contact Hours: 2 lab

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

PMD 80224     RADIOLOGY AND MEDICAL IMAGING II      2 Credit Hours

The Spring semester course will continue to the topic of imaging complex diabetic foot problems, focusing on non-invasive imaging modalities as potential problem solvers. The first of these will be radionuclide imaging modalities, which will be covered in detail. From the diabetic foot, the course will then logically continue onto defining and then detailing the classic metabolic bone disorders. The course will then delve into the basics of MR and CT sectional imaging. The course will then formally cover applications to common pedal problems such as infection, trauma, and bone and soft tissue tumors. The course will then conclude with an introduction to diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

PMD 80396     INDEPENDENT STUDY      5 Credit Hours

Independent study in Podiatric Medicine.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Individual Investigation

Contact Hours: 5 other

Grade Mode: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory

Podiatric Surgery (SUR)

SUR 80221     INTRODUCTION TO PODIATRIC SURGERY      2 Credit Hours

This course is designed to provide the 2nd year podiatric medical student with a comprehensive understanding of the basic and fundamental principles and techniques of surgery, with emphasis on wound healing, closure techniques, hemostasis, lower extremity tourniquets and basic surgical procedures. Surgical and hospital protocol, charting, instrumentation and injection techniques are taught in this course, along with basic forefoot surgery, including nail disorders, soft tissue, skin tumors and digital surgery. The use of local anesthetic agents including indications, classification, pharmacology, adverse reactions (and treatment of such reactions) and injection techniques will be discussed. In addition, the course provides an orientation to operating room protocol, allowing students to master necessary techniques of asepsis, gowning, gloving and surgical scrubbing. Introduction to these skills will be taught in weekly workshops in the surgical skills lab.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

SUR 80313     PODIATRIC SURGERY      2 Credit Hours

A comprehensive working knowledge of common deformities of the foot is essential to the podiatric physician in providing comprehensive care of patients. This course provides the 3rd year podiatric medical student with the knowledge of surgical management of patients and their foot deformities. The course includes material on the etiology, clinical and radiographic evaluation, indications and contraindications, as well as postoperative considerations and care. These courses discuss the surgical management of deformities of the foot, ankle and lower leg and include surgical complications. In addition, several lectures are dedicated to special topics, such as AO/ASIF Fixation, Bio-materials, Arthroscopic surgical procedures and reconstructive foot and ankle procedures. Weekly skills workshops will be held in the surgical skills laboratory. Emphasis is placed on current and prevailing concepts and techniques employed by the podiatric physician.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

SUR 80323     PODIATRIC SURGERY      2 Credit Hours

A comprehensive working knowledge of common deformities of the foot is essential to the podiatric physician in providing comprehensive care of patients. This course provides the 3rd year podiatric medical student with the knowledge of surgical management of patients and their foot deformities. The course includes material on the etiology, clinical and radiographic evaluation, indications and contraindications, as well as postoperative considerations and care. These courses discuss the surgical management of deformities of the foot, ankle and lower leg and include surgical complications. In addition, several lectures are dedicated to special topics, such as AO/ASIF Fixation, Bio-materials, Arthroscopic surgical procedures and reconstructive foot and ankle procedures. Weekly skills workshops will be held in the surgical skills laboratory. Emphasis is placed on current and prevailing concepts and techniques employed by the podiatric physician.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

SUR 80325     TRAUMATOLOGY      2 Credit Hours

The purpose of the course is to provide the 3rd year podiatric medical students with a broad overview and appreciation of the major trauma areas of the foot, including the midfoot, rearfoot, ankle and lower leg. A strong effort is made to correlate the mechanical, surgical, physiologic and anatomic principles of surgery with emphasis on their implications and applications in major reconstructive surgery and the management of the trauma patient who presents with foot and or ankle trauma. Surgical procedures for the management of specific trauma situations will be discussed, as well as indications, contraindications, and post-operative management. An overall view of the trauma patient as viewed in a Level I trauma center will also be included as this is a major responsibility for the podiatric physician treating the trauma patient.

Prerequisite: enrolled in the College of Podiatric Medicine.

Schedule Type: Lecture

Contact Hours: 2 lecture

Grade Mode: Standard Letter