Exploratory

University College
Center for Undergraduate Excellence
Kent Campus
330-672-0980
www.kent.edu/universitycollege


Description

The Exploratory major affords a tremendous opportunity for students to discover, create, and learn about themselves, majors, and careers. Students who are exploring majors, have yet to select a major, or wish to change their major benefit from the guidance, advising and support offered in the Exploratory Advising Center. Beginning with the required course during the first semester of classes (UC 10097), academic advisors assist students in choosing a focus in one of 13 broad interest areas listed below. This is a non-degree granting major and by the time the student reaches 45 credit hours, the student must select a major.

  • Aeronautics, Applied Engineering and Technology
    Are you curious about how things work? Are you a great problem solver, have a flare for detail and organizing, and an interest in green technologies that can improve the quality of life for people? Maybe you enjoy using technology to get things done or to solve problems when they arise, or you spend time playing flight simulation video games. If so, you might wish to consider careers in aviation, emerging technologies, production or manufacturing and sustainability.
  • Biological Sciences, Health and Wellness
    Are you committed to improving the health and well-being of others? Do you like to study human behavior or want to pursue a career in nursing, nutrition, speech pathology and audiology, counseling or other health-related fields? You may want to consider a major in the area of biological sciences, health and wellness where you will learn to use the knowledge and techniques of biological and biomedical science as well as the knowledge of the helping professions to promote the maintenance of health and the prevention of illness.
  • Business
    Are you a problem solver and good communicator? Do you like to think strategically and lead others? You may find that a major in the area of business is right for you. Learn to analyze business problems through the development of skills in accounting, finance, economics and information systems, and gain an understanding of real world business problems through case studies and simulations.
  • Communications, Journalism and Media
    If you can imagine yourself writing for a major news organization, producing television shows and movies, providing corporate training and development, designing political or health campaigns, working as a social media manager, creating advertising or public relations campaigns or working as a speech writer for CEOs or political leaders, majors in this field will appeal to you. Opportunities spanning multiple industries await you in TV, radio, film, print or electronic media, corporate communications, international business and diplomacy. Learn different aspects of communication and information theory, research, use and practice while engaging in scholarly investigations and practical applications of the elements and means of creating, managing, using and evaluating messages.
  • Computers, Mathematics and Information Sciences
    Can you easily solve a Rubik’s cube or disentanglement puzzle, figure out logic teasers or optical illusions, and decrypt secret message codes? These games of strategy are good indicators that your problem-solving and critical thinking skills could be applied to the study of information and computation, as well as the new area of digital sciences. Understand the properties, uses, and impact of the programs used to implement software and use that understanding to create new programs or improve existing ones.
  • Design
    Do you enjoy the process of communicating through visual means – using illustration, photography, motion graphics or the Internet to express a concept or solve a problem? Are you intrigued by the use of lights, stage props and sound in theatre and dance productions to create unique environments? Or perhaps the environment you are interested in is one of residential and commercial spaces – the lighting, interior materials and color, signage and graphics, or the very structure and form of a building. Are you admired for your sense of fashion and have an ability and interest in designing and constructing your concepts? A wide range of academic programs in design provide students with an opportunity to merge a creative life with a profession and to work individually, collaboratively or within an organization to bring value and beauty to our global community.
  • Education and Teaching
    Can you envision yourself shaping young minds and preparing them for a successful future? Do those who know you well describe you as nurturing, patient, organized, a multi-tasker good at explaining things and somewhat conventional in your views? If these adjectives resonate with you, then you’ll probably find a rewarding career as an educator. For those interested in advanced degrees in schools, schooling, education in non-school settings, and leadership positions, there are opportunities to add endorsements, licenses, or degrees to strengthen knowledge in teaching, learning, administration, and leadership in a variety of disciplines.
  • Government, Public Policy and Justice
    Are you able to resolve disputes? Are you committed to the pursuit of truth? If you are also a detailed problem solver, articulate communicator, and passionate about righting wrongs, you should explore majors in this area. Study the action, regulatory measures, laws, social service agency engagement, social justice, and funding priorities developed by government, agencies, or representatives and use qualitative and quantitative methods to understand and assess their impact.
  • Human Services and Social Sciences
    Do you want to make a difference in the lives of others? As long as you are resourceful, committed, empathic, and empowering, you can help to change the world. Start living out your calling by providing a voice for the people who need it most.
  • Languages, Literature and Culture
    Have you wondered about people and their roots and history? Do you enjoy languages? Study the creation, organization, and use of human knowledge, belief, and behavior. Investigate how the development of symbolic languages and social learning have impacted shared attitudes, values, goals, and practices associated with human institutions, organizations, and groups.
  • Physical Sciences and the Environment
    If you are intrigued by the natural world and its sustainability, you may have happened upon your ideal area of study. You should be highly inquisitive, detail oriented, analytical and adventurous. Or, you may choose to prepare for scientific careers in the fascinating world of physical science which uses experimental and quantitative methods to study, model, and understand natural and physical phenomena.
  • Sport, Recreation and Hospitality
    Do you want to be in the business of playing? Your competitive, persistent nature will serve you well on the athletic field as well as in sports management or marketing/promotion. You may also consider the hospitality industry and event planning or community-based park and wellness facilities. The ability to plan activities, motivate and involve participants is critical.
  • Visual and Performing Arts
    Do you find it exciting to express your ideas and emotions through art, music or dance? Are you intrigued by the process of staging productions? Do you enjoy studying the history of visual and performing arts? If you are disciplined, energetic and drawn to challenging artistic environments that demand your best, then a major in the visual and performing arts could be the right choice for you. Study at the graduate level fosters an exciting intersection between professional training and academic excellence where you are encouraged to create artistic projects that combine theory, history, criticism, pedagogy, and interdisciplinary studies.

To assist students in making informed major choices by the time they reach 45 credit hours, all Exploratory students participate in the Exploration Plan. There are six main components of the Exploration Plan that students participate. Students will:

  • Select one of 13 areas of interest to begin exploring. This is the first step and will be completed before the student's first semester.
  • Create an Exploration Action Plan using the results of a career readiness inventory and continuously update the plan until a major is declared.
  • Engage in the First Year Experience course (UC 10097), which will focus on the transition to college and utilizes a curriculum developed specifically for exploratory students, including career exploration, developing an awareness of diverse perspectives, learning about personality preferences and much more. 
  • Enroll in a course that is co-registered with UC 10097, providing students with the opportunity to network with fellow peers and create study groups. Some of the co-registered courses include experiential learning components, which promote academic relevance, meaning and an understanding of real-world issues. 
  • Enroll in UC 20010 in the student's second semester. In this course, students explore themselves, explore careers, make connections and set career-related goals. As a bonus, if students are part of EXCEL, they will take this course with other EXCEL students. 
  • Participate in the EXCEL (EXplore, Careers, Education, Leadership) Learning Community. EXCEL is designed to assist with major selection by guiding the student through career, education and leadership exploration. EXCEL is housed in Lake Hall for students living on campus; however, Honors College students living in honors housing and students who commute may also participate in EXCEL. 

Each exploratory student is assigned an academic advisor who monitors academic progress and assists the student in choosing a degree program. Academic advisors also encourage students to take advantage of specialized advising, workshops and other university resources in developing career goals and making informed decisions. Exploratory academic advisors are housed in the Exploratory Advising Center; students have a minimum of one required meeting with an advisor each semester during the first year of study.

Fully Offered At:

  • Kent Campus

Admission Requirements

The university affirmatively strives to provide educational opportunities and access to students with varied backgrounds, those with special talents and adult students who graduated from high school three or more years ago.

Freshman Students on the Kent Campus: The freshman admission policy on the Kent Campus is selective. Admission decisions are based upon the following: cumulative grade point average, ACT and/or SAT scores, strength of high school college preparatory curriculum and grade trends. The Admissions Office at the Kent Campus may defer the admission of students who do not meet admissions criteria but who demonstrate areas of promise for successful college study. Deferred applicants may begin their college coursework at one of seven Regional Campuses of Kent State University. For more information on admissions, including additional requirements for some academic programs, visit the admissions website for new freshmen.

Freshman Students on the Regional Campuses:  Kent State campuses at Ashtabula, East Liverpool, Geauga, Salem, Stark, Trumbull and Tuscarawas, as well as the Regional Academic Center in Twinsburg, have open enrollment admission for students who hold a high school diploma, GED or equivalent.

English Language Proficiency Requirements for International Students: All international students must provide proof of English language proficiency (unless they meet specific exceptions) by earning a minimum 525 TOEFL score (71 on the Internet-based version), minimum 75 MELAB score, minimum 6.0 IELTS score or minimum 48 PTE Academic score, or by completing the ELS level 112 Intensive Program. For more information on international admission, visit the Office of Global Education’s admission website.

Transfer, Transitioning and Former Students: For more information about admission criteria for transfer, transitioning and former students, please visit the admissions website.

 
 

Roadmap

This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses designated as critical (!) must be completed in the semester listed to ensure a timely graduation.

Plan of Study Grid
Semester OneCredits
!UC 10097 DESTINATION KENT STATE: FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE 1
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
 Credit Hours16
Semester Two
!UC 20010 CAREER NAVIGATION: CONSTRUCTING POSSIBILITIES 2
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
 Credit Hours14
Semester Three
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
Kent Core Requirement 3
Elective or Foreign Language 6
 Credit Hours15
 Minimum Total Credit Hours:45